Obama Expands U.S. Military Role in Latin America, Again

Under the guise of fighting a more vigorous “war on drugs,” the Obama administration will continue adding to the exploding government deficit by expanding the already widespread and extremely costly U.S. military presence throughout Latin America. Critics in the United States and all across the Western hemisphere, however, have slammed the controversial scheme’s growth from all angles.

According to an investigative report published February 3 by the Associated Press, the federal government’s controversial “war” in Latin America is ballooning at unprecedented rates. Consider, for example, the record $3 billion in military equipment transfers to governments in the region authorized by Obama in 2011 — a quadrupling of the figures from just a decade ago. Almost 90 percent of the nearly $1 billion in aid for military and law enforcement in Latin America was spent on the “drug war,” the AP reported.

Several thousand U.S. troops are deployed in the region at any given time, and as The New American reported last year, Obama just sent hundreds of Marines to Guatemala to fight the “drug war” after the anti-communist president there called for total legalization. According to the AP, U.S. government pilots flying drug missions for at least 10 separate federal law-enforcement agencies clocked almost 50,000 hours on drug missions in Latin America.

Meanwhile, American troops are training dubious military forces all over the region — all over the world, actually — to help wage the controversial war. The U.S. government also uses its own resources, such as satellites and “intelligence” capabilities, to help questionable Latin American regimes crack down on certain drug cartels even as others receive official assistance in the form of protection and arms.

If Obama gets his way, despite federal deficits topping $1 trillion annually and Latin American leaders increasingly calling for new strategies such as legalization, the expensive “drug war” militarization trend is expected to continue exploding. Congress, meanwhile, aside from the occasional mild criticism from members on either side of the aisle, seems more than willing to go along with the president’s controversial plans.

– Read the entire article at The New American.

Comments

3 Comments

  1. Mrs. Ratsrectum on

    The U.S. cherry-picks the international treaties that it wants to adhere to. It ignores international treaties on going to war, torture, sovereignty (drones) of other countries because its military-industrian-prison complex is in control. That’s why they can have secret prisons around the world, as was recently reported by the Open Society Foundation.

    Yet, when it comes to cannabis, the U.S. must adhere to outdated international treaties. Why? It’s the major exporter of arms to the rest of the world. The drug war gives the U.S. excuses to get involved all over the world, and since the CIA is reaping assets from the illegal drugs market (item: Iran-Contra, Mexican state governors, etc.) there is no telling how many heads this hydra has, nor how many tentacles of the leviathan. They are not going to give up on that money, because there is no way the Congress will be able to defend to the American people the funding of such activities if it’s all open and visible.

    The U.S. can’t keep deficit spending for long. If they simply keep printing more money, inflation will be staggering, and creditors such as China, will not appreciate being paid back in ever more worthless currency.

    “If Obama gets his way, despite federal deficits topping $1 trillion annually and Latin American leaders increasingly calling for new strategies such as legalization, the expensive “drug war” militarization trend is expected to continue exploding. Congress, meanwhile, aside from the occasional mild criticism from members on either side of the aisle, seems more than willing to go along with the president’s controversial plans.”

    The U.S. is supposed to adhere to cutting its deficit in half, according to something it agreed to in Toronto in 2010. Item: This quote from the German newspaper, Die Welt, and how Europeans are disappointed in Obama for throwing austerity out the window. Europeans are looking to establish some kind of free trade zone between Europe and the U.S. and the U.S. also to do the same with the Asian trade zone.

    Eigentlich hatten sich die G-20-Länder – einschließlich der USA – 2010 in Toronto darauf geeinigt, ihre Defizite zu halbieren und den Schuldenstand bis 2016 zu stabilisieren.

    It’s a damn shame about Latin America. How many more people will have to die between now and when cannabis is legalized and the U.S. takes a Trimos Instituut style harm reduction approach to hard drugs? Too damn many!

  2. Anonymous UK on

    If they are now that Washington and Colorado have legalised then how can they justify spending money to enforce drug treaties in foreign countries ? Extra spending on military power will just escalate the situation – it will not maintain the status quo, it will not decrease the killing, terror and corruption. If they must stop it why can’t they stop it at the border or in distribution – the lack of pressure may well increase production in Latin America but it will not create more ways in to the US. Grow Opium and Coca leaf in the US then have good rehab programmes that wean people off their addiction – combined with regulated cannabis the international drugs trade and the associated violence will just wither away. And you will save money and lives.

    “Shooting at drug traffickers” -does not equal- “protecting people from the harms of drugs”

  3. Anonymous on

    Americans consume more than their share of recreational drugs, and most of us are mildly/moderately addicted to coffee/caffeine, like it or not it’s the American way and prohibition only leads to corruption and worse. I’m positive America is supposed to be the defender of freedom, and supporters of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness (I even had to pass tests on this in school). I’m perfectly sane and I don’t see how the drug war fits onto American ideals at all, as it is a direct betrayal of constitutionally guaranteed personal freedoms of the individual.