Arkansas Supreme Court Upholds Proposed Ballot Measure To Legalize Medical Marijuana

The Arkansas Supreme Court upheld a proposed ballot measure Thursday that, if successful, would make the state the first in the more conservative southern U.S. to legalize medical marijuana.

Justices rejected a challenge by a coalition of conservative groups who wanted to block the measure from a November vote.

The measure would allow patients with qualifying conditions, such as cancer, glaucoma, HIV, AIDS and Alzheimer’s disease, to buy marijuana from non-profit dispensaries with a doctor’s recommendation. A provision would allow minors to use it with parental consent.

The proposal acknowledges that marijuana is still illegal under federal law, but opponents argue that it doesn’t adequately explain that users could face federal prosecution.

“This is about the first incremental step to legalizing marijuana for recreational use,” said coalition member Larry Page, the director of the Arkansas Faith and Ethics Council.

Seventeen states and the District of Columbia have legalized marijuana in some fashion. Massachusetts voters are also expected to vote on the issue this fall, while the North Dakota Supreme Court ruled that a medical marijuana initiative can’t appear on that state’s ballot.

– Read the entire article at The Montreal Gazzette.