“The House I Live In”: New Documentary Exposes Economic, Moral Failure of U.S. War on Drugs

This weekend the top documentary prize at the Sundance Film Festival went to “The House I Live In.”

This film questions why the United States has spent more than $1 trillion on drug arrests in the past 40 years, and yet drugs are cheaper, purer and more available today than ever. The film examines the economic, as well as the moral and practical, failures of the so-called “war on drugs” and calls on the United States to approach drug abuse not as a “war,” but as a matter of public health.

We need “a very changed dialogue in this country that understands drugs as a public health concern and not a criminal justice concern,” says the film’s director, Eugene Jarecki. “That means the system has to say, ‘We were wrong.'”

We also speak with Nannie Jeter, who helped raise Jarecki as her own son succumbed to drug addiction and is highlighted in the film. We air clips from the film, featuring Michelle Alexander, author of “The New Jim Crow”; Canadian physician and bestselling author, Gabor Maté; and David Simon, creator of “The Wire.”

– Article originally from Democracy Now!.

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