Marijuana Cheaper and Easier to Get Than Ever

Billions of dollars have been put towards nipping the drug-trade in the bud, yet the ease of obtaining marijuana and its potency have bloomed, while its price has dropped, according to a prominent group lobbying for cannabis legalization.

A new report by the Stop the Violence BC coalition of health, academic and justice experts will be released today to demonstrate the result of current anti-drug policy.

It uses government-funded data to show that cannabis trends are thriving, despite decades of huge cash injections to law enforcement agencies in both Canada and the U.S.

“If the goal is to reduce the availability of marijuana, it’s clearly been a dramatic failure,” said Dr. Evan Wood, a founding member of the coalition and director at the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV-AIDS.

“By every metric, the government’s own data has shown this policy has clearly not achieved its stated objective.”

The report, called “How not to protect community health and safety,” is being released as the federal Conservatives’ omnibus crime bill — which toughens penalties for growing and possessing pot — heads towards speedy passage into law.

The coalition contends the proposed measures continue to propel policy in the wrong direction, when what the government should be doing is regulating and taxing cannabis under a comprehensive public health framework.

Asked for reaction to the report, a spokeswoman for the federal justice minister was terse.

“Our government has no intention to decriminalize or legalize marijuana,” said Julie Di Mambro in an email.

Arrests and cannabis seizures soared when anti-drug funding jumped, according to available data presented in the report, but none of the other anticipated impacts materialized.

Since 2007, the majority of at least $260 million in funding against drugs from Ottawa has been allocated to policing. Between 1990 to 2009, arrests have increased by 70 per cent.

Meanwhile, the parallel U.S. budget has increased from $1.5 billion in 1981 to $18 billion in 2002.

Arrests jumped there by 160 per cent between 1990 and 2009, while pot seizures more than quadrupled.

But at the same time, prevalence of cannabis use rose.

The Canadian Alcohol and Drug Use Monitoring Survey showed 27 per cent of B.C. youth between 15 and 24 smoked weed at least once in the previous year.

In Ontario, the number of high school students using pot doubled from fewer than 10 per cent in 1991 to more than 20 per cent in 2009.

In the U.S., use climbed about eight per cent among Grade 12 students.

“It’s just so clear that organized crime has absolutely overwhelmed these law enforcement efforts with the price of marijuana going down dramatically … (and) the potency has gone up astronomically,” Wood said.

Among the groups supporting the initiative to legalize marijuana is the 19-member Health Officer’s Council of B.C.

Dr. Paul Hasselback, who chairs the council, said medical experts are not asserting the drug is safe, but that policy as it stands puts the public at even greater risk.

“We need to acknowledge that our current approach to some of our substance-use policies is perhaps not as evidence-based as it should be,” he said.

“We need to be proceeding to a dialogue that keeps the public’s health as one of the prime drivers in the decision-making process.”

Hasselback noted that unlike widely-used substances like alcohol and tobacco, officials can’t proscribe measures for safe use of cannabis — simply because it’s illegal.

The public is wary of the dangers of drinking and driving, he added, but there’s very little knowledge or research around using pot and driving for the same reason.

Scientific literature also dispels the myth that smoking pot leads individuals along the path to harder drug use, he said.

“That just hasn’t played out. There’s a great deal of recreational soft cannabis use and … it’s not the gateway drug that can be a perception of many people.”

A U.K. study published in the Lancet in 2007 that compared a range of substances found cannabis to be less harmful than both alcohol and tobacco, the report notes.

Stop the Violence BC launched its campaign in October with a report that showed criminal organizations are making huge profits and engaging in street-level warfare over the underground drug trade.

– Article from CTV News.


Expert audit of government data proves failure of cannabis prohibition B.C.’s top public health doctors join call for ending marijuana prohibition Polling results show most British Columbians believe alcohol more harmful than cannabis

by Stop the Violence BC

B.C.’s top public health doctors join call for ending marijuana prohibition

Polling results show most British Columbians believe alcohol more harmful than cannabis

December 22, 2011 [Vancouver, Canada] – Following Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s recent rejection of marijuana law reform, Stop the Violence BC has released a new report that audits government funded surveillance systems and concludes that increased funding for anti?marijuana law enforcement does not meet its objectives of decreasing marijuana supply, potency, or cannabis use.

Coinciding with the report’s release, the Health Officers’ Council of BC (HOC), a registered society in British Columbia of public health physicians who advise and advocate for public policies and programs directed to improving the health of populations, has unanimously passed a resolution to support Stop the Violence BC. This follows the HOC’s release of their own report last month calling for the public health?oriented regulation of alcohol, tobacco, and illegal substances to better reduce the harms that result both from substance use and the unintended consequences of government policies.

Stop the Violence BC’s new report, entitled How not to protect community health and safety: What the government’s own data say about the effects of cannabis prohibition, advocates for a strict regulatory framework and public health approach to legal cannabis sales, using 20 years of data collected by surveillance systems funded by the Canadian and U.S. governments to highlight the failure of cannabis prohibition in North America.

“If you look at the data that governments themselves have collected, it is clear beyond a reasonable doubt that marijuana prohibition has failed to achieve its intended objectives and has actually contributed to a range of serious unintended consequences in terms of organized crime and gang violence,” said Dr. Evan Wood, a physician and founder of Stop the Violence BC.

Added Dr. John Carsley, a medical health officer based in Vancouver: “From a scientific and public health perspective, we urgently need to pursue alternatives to the blanket prohibition of marijuana which are based on evidence. Strict regulation, guided by a public health framework, is clearly the logical way forward.”

Despite dramatically increased law enforcement funding and mandatory minimum sentences for cannabis offenses, U.S. government data demonstrates that cannabis prohibition has not resulted in a decrease in cannabis availability or accessibility. According to the US Office of National Drug Control Policy, federal anti?drug expenditures in the U.S. increased 600% from $1.5 billion in 1981 to over $18 billion in 2002. However, during this same period, the potency of cannabis actually increased by 145% and the price of cannabis decreased by a dramatic 58%.

While not all of the US anti?drug budget?funded programs are specific to the enforcement of cannabis prohibition, increased funding for anti?drug initiatives coincided with a 160% increase in cannabis? related arrests and a 420% increase in cannabis?related seizures between 1990 and 2009. Similarly, Canada has seen a 70% increase in the annual number of cannabis arrests, from roughly 39,000 in 1990 to more than 65,000 in 2009.

However, the increase in enforcement expenditures and arrests is not keeping marijuana out of the hands of teenagers and young adults in British Columbia. The 2009 Canadian Alcohol and Drug Use Monitoring Survey reported that 27% of youth in B.C. aged 15?24 used cannabis at least once in the previous year, while data collected by the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey demonstrate that annual cannabis use among Ontario high school students has doubled since the early 1990s, from under 10% in 1991 to over 20% in 2009.

“The unmistakable interpretation of government surveillance data is that increased funding for anti? cannabis law enforcement does increase cannabis seizures and arrests, but the assumption that this approach reduces cannabis potency, increases price or meaningfully reduces cannabis availability and use is inconsistent with virtually all available data,” concludes the report.

New poll: Most British Columbians disagree that cannabis is more harmful than alcohol

Accompanying the report, Stop the Violence BC released polling data from Angus Reid that demonstrates that the majority of British Columbians:

  • disagree that regular marijuana use is more harmful than regular alcohol use (59%)
  • disagree with the statement that marijuana is a dangerous and addictive drug (54%)
  • do not believe that marijuana is a “gateway” drug that can lead to the use of more dangerous drugs like heroin (51%)

“It is notable that a majority of British Columbians understand that alcohol is in many ways more dangerous than marijuana. At the same time, there are still incorrect beliefs that cannabis is a ‘gateway’ to other dangerous drug consumption,” said Dr. Paul Hasselback, Chair of the Health Officer’s Council of BC and a medical health officer from Vancouver Island. “The Health Officer’s Council and other experts are not saying that marijuana should be legalized and taxed because it is safe. We are saying that proven public health approaches should be used to constrain its use. There is now more danger to the public’s health in perpetuating a market driven by criminal activity.”

A call for response from politicians

“This report should ring alarm bells for political leaders who have been unwilling to acknowledge what the vast majority of British Columbians already understand – cannabis prohibition is a costly failure,” said Dr. Thomas Kerr, a coalition member and Director of the Urban Health Research Initiative at the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS and St. Paul’s Hospital. “With ongoing gang warfare over massive profits from the illegal cannabis trade and government data clearly showing the easy availability of cannabis despite decades of prohibition, our elected officials must revisit prohibition and tell us what they plan to do to decrease gang violence and protect the health of young British Columbians.”

With the launch of their new report, Stop the Violence BC wants politicians at all levels of government to address the following questions when it comes to B.C.’s marijuana trade:

1. Do you acknowledge the causal link between cannabis prohibition and the growth of organized crime and gang violence? If yes, what do you propose to do about it, especially in light of the evidence showing that the mandatory minimum sentences being considered for Canada have proven to be extremely costly and ineffective in the U.S.?

2. Do you support the Health Officer’s Council of BC’s recommendation that the province examine ways that adult marijuana use be legally regulated under a public health framework that can shift profit from organized crime groups to tax revenue for governments?

3. Do you believe that marijuana prohibition is effectively reducing the availability of cannabis? Research demonstrates that cannabis is more available to young people than alcohol and tobacco – what do you propose and intend to do about it?

About Stop the Violence BC

Stop the Violence BC is a coalition of law enforcement officials, legal experts, public health officials and academic experts from the University of British Columbia, Simon Fraser University, University of Victoria, and the University of Northern BC. Coalition members have come together to engage all British Columbians in a discussion aimed at developing and implementing marijuana?related policies that improve public health while reducing social harms, including violent crime.

For a full listing of coalition members and to learn more about the coalition, please visit www.stoptheviolencebc.org/about?us/

For quotes from coalition members, photos and links to downloadable videos of coalition members speaking about the report, please visit www.stoptheviolence.org/coalition?members/

About the Health Officer’s Council of British Columbia

The Health Officers Council (HOC) of BC is a registered society in British Columbia of public health physicians who, among other activities, advise and advocate for public policies and programs directed to improving the health of populations. The HOC provides recommendations to and works with a wide range of government and non?government agencies, both in and outside of BC.

Physicians involved in HOC include medical health officers in BC and the Yukon, physicians at the BC Centre for Disease Control, Ministry of Health, First Nations and Inuit Health and university departments as well as private consultants. The HOC is independent from these organizations and as such positions taken by HOC do not necessarily represent positions of the organization for which the members work.

About Angus Reid Public Opinion

Angus Reid Public Opinion is the Public Affairs practice of Vision Critical headed by Dr. Angus Reid: an industry visionary who has spent more than four decades asking questions to figure out what people feel, how they think and who they will vote for.

Comments

6 Comments

  1. Pingback: The Fed Ban Lift On Medical Marijuana Has Scientists Thrilled 

  2. Regina M. on

    We have notice that, when the price of Marijuana went down to 58%…The street boys have been trying to sell; half a nickle bag for a nickle!..claming there is a dry spell…lol! I did not know they made bags that small…lol

    By the way WHO regulates the price of Marijuana across the board?…can somebody tell me this info. If it can be regulated across the board the way it just did; sounds like wallstreet still have their hands in this also.

    If only they knew that the prices have gone down that the weight has not changed…we get more Marijuana for the dollar! now that’s good news…like it use to be back in the day a little bit. they keep it up we will see the old 4 finger oz. for $20. again!

    And let Newt G. know we all know about Jefferson, Washington and five other Presidents who raised Marijuana and toked too! To bad he is out there all alone on his war on dugh! alcolhol and cigarettes, opium, methamphetimines, cocain, heron, blues, reds, yellow sunshine,purple haze..pills remember? brother man is so far to the left, he does’t see the hole before TREES…lol! his people aint said a word to him…man oh! man…is this what we want for a president; the worst of the super-lame-ducks! PLEASE!!! get a real life…lay off the booz; face all red!

  3. Anonymous on

    The THC oil, extracted from the cannabis marijuana plant, taken orally, a few drops a day, works with the human healing system to heal and rejuvenate the whole body. Since medical testing is prohibited, there will never be clinical proof. What is the government trying to hide. Do the Pharmaceutical Corporations pay the Gov’t under the table to make sure they do not legalize so the corps can make trillions is profits from their drugs, since marijuana cannot be patented. Just think how healthy Canadians can be if they used a few drops per day. There would be no need for cancer or other specialists, since the THC oil would prevent all diseases. Medical costs would be very low.

  4. Anonymous on

    I read that the CIA is the biggest drug peddlers in the world. They want to keep marijuana illegal so the price will be very high so their profits will be huge so that they can use the billions to pay for all their covert operations throughout the world and not have to account for all the money to Congress. No wonder the Drug Tsar cannot stop marijuana and other drugs from being imported—who is going to check the CIA at the borders ? ? Time Canada legalized and controlled the growing and marketing of marijuana.

  5. Rodinski on

    All students and working, tax paying Canadian citizens over 21 should have the right to pick their own poison. You can vote at 18 but not for cannabis prohibition as we have no say or choice in government policies.
    Cannabis enforcement policies have too much at stake here. Too many jobs depend on it. It really is a huge industry all paid for by us, the tax cows.
    Let us all vote amend Bill C-10 in the next election. It should be put high on the agenda by any rising opposition stars on the horizon.
    To criminalize the medicinal cannabis community for making a personal choice should be a human rights issue, along with all recreational users including chronic s and occasional users who happen to number in the millions. Why keep punishing us and the taxpayer.

  6. Anonymous on

    Prohibition has the perverse(from the point of view of prohibitionists)and paradoxical effect of rendering the marijuana plant more attractive to all.Thu shall not smoke of that dried flower bud.Oh yeah, just try me !
    Sorry, I meant just try us !