Cannabis Culture News LIVE: The 2nd Annual Treating Yourself Expo in Toronto

CANNABIS CULTURE – Watch Cannabis Culture News LIVE for the latest news and views on pot politics and the marijuana community. In this episode: The Treating Yourself Expo, Canada’s largest marijuana trade show, is coming back to the Metro Toronto Convention Centre from June 3 – 5. Expo organizer and Treating Yourself Magazine publisher Marco Renda joins the show to discuss the big event.

Activist and magazine publisher Marc Renda joins Cannabis Culture Editor Jeremiah Vandermeer by phone to discuss the 2nd Annual Treating Yourself Expo in Toronto and talk about the difficulties and rewards of organizing such a large pot-inspired production.

The 2nd Annual 2011 Treating Yourself Expo will be at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre from June 3 – 5, 2011 and will feature hundreds of vendors and exhibitors from the marijuana community – as well as speakers, live music, the “World’s Largest Vapor Lounge”, and much more.

BUY TICKETS HERE or find out more about the TY Expo.

Jeremiah also discusses some of the latest cannabis news from around the globe.

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Discussed on today’s show:

Patient Advocates Back Three Medical Marijuana Bills Introduced Today in Congress
http://www.cannabisculture.com/v2/content/2011/05/25/Patient-Advocates-Back-Three-Medical-Marijuana-Bills-Introduced-Today-Congress

Marijuana Legalization Initiatives Filed in Colorado
http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/2011/may/26/marijuana_legalization_initiativ

Dutch Government to Ban Tourists From Cannabis Shops
http://www.cannabisculture.com/v2/content/2011/05/27/Dutch-Cabinet-Commits-Anti-Marijuana-Plan

The 2nd Annual Treating Yourself Expo
http://www.treatingyourselfexpo.com/

Jeremiah Vandermeer is editor of Cannabis Culture. Follow him on Facebook and Twitter.

Comments

1 Comment

  1. Anonymous on

    This article shows that the time of cannabis use can be predicted like alcohol. Make safe driving laws and legalize it!

    “Estimating the time of last cannabis use from plasma delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol concentrations”
    Author: Barnes, Allan; Huestis, Marilyn A; Smith, Michael L

    Abstract
    Knowing the time cannabis was last used is important for determining impairment in accident investigations and clinical evaluations. Two models for predicting time of last cannabis use from single plasma cannabinoid concentrations-model I, using Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and model II, using the concentration ratio of 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH) to THC-were developed and validated from controlled drug administration studies. Objectives of the current study were to extend the validation by use of a large number of plasma samples collected after administration of single and multiple doses of THC and to examine the effectiveness of the models at low plasma cannabinoid concentrations. Thirty-eight cannabis users each smoked a 2.64% THC cigarette in the morning, and 30 also smoked a second cigarette in the afternoon. Blood samples (n = 717) were collected at intervals after smoking, and plasma THC and THCCOOH concentrations measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Predicted times of cannabis smoking, based on each model, were compared with actual smoking times. The most accurate approach applied a combination of models I and II. For all 717 plasma samples, 99% of predicted times of last use were within the 95% confidence interval, 0.9% were overestimated, and none were underestimated. For 289 plasma samples collected after multiple doses, 97% were correct with no underestimates. All time estimates were correct for 76 plasma samples with THC concentrations between 0.5 and 2 mug/L, a concentration range not previously examined. This study extends the validation of the predictive models of time of last cannabis use to include multiple exposures and low THC concentrations. The models provide an objective and validated method for assessing the contribution of cannabis to accidents or clinical symptoms.