Marc Emery’s Prison Potcast #4 – Stephen Harper and The End of Days

CANNABIS CULTURE – In episode #4 of the Prison Potcast, Marc Emery reads his new essay “Stephen Harper and The End of Days (of Canada as we know it): Revelations about the Conservative Party’s direction for Canada”.

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“End of Days” is an comprehensive analysis of the Conservative Party of Canada’s new “tough-on-crime” laws, and Stephen Harper’s demented vision of Canada’s future as a Neo-Conservo-Christian paradise, where corporations profit as non-violent Canadians are locked up for smoking marijuana.

Marc discusses the hypocrisy of Conservative Party members who want to increase arrests and convert the country into a Super-Prison-State – and then get busted for drinking and driving, cocaine or other sordid offenses. Marc paints a disturbing picture of Harper’s plans for Canada as he stacks the Senate, Courts, and other governmental agencies with friends and fellow evangelicals.

Marc Emery is a marijuana activist imprisoned at North Fraser Pretrial Centre in Port Coquitlam, B.C. awaiting extradition to the United States for selling marijuana seeds and using the profits to fund pot activist groups.

Click here to read more about Political Prisoner Marc Emery.

Click here for more Episodes of Marc Emery’s Prison Potcast.



  1. Troy Campbell on

    I do know for sure after having to spend a weekend in the east toronto detention center I saw plenty of pot and other drugs flying around and many inmates actually have there drugs smuggled in by guards.

  2. Another tax-paying scofflaw on

    Scofflaw? You mean the man who faithfully paid taxes on his sales for all the years he was in business in Canada – the guy who donated all the profits to charitable and political causes? Is that what you call a scofflaw?

    And let’s be clear, Emery’s brother may be one of millions of decent evangelical Christians but, unlike Stephen Harper, he is not trying to put our sons and daughters in jail with mandatory jail sentences for growing a single pot plant.

  3. Anonymous on

    Fast, safe, and discreet shipping of premium grade B.C. cannabis conveniently to you. Visit for more details.

  4. Anonymous on

    why all the innuendo and speculation about religion? Why not be honest and just say you like to get high? All these sketchy associations with everyone from Zoroster to Jesus only serve to cast you as a stoner who likes to daydream.

    Jesus certainly wasn’t a pot smoker and the Judaism doesn’t make anointing oil from hash. I am surprised that you missed the one M.E. reference that is true, namely that we derive our word assassin from hashishim, with the -im signifying “the people of” in Hebrew. Why would they think pot smokers are assassins if they themselves used it in their ceremonies? The old areas of hash use were the same as the production areas of today, Lebanon, Afghanistan, and India/Pakistan but the god(s) of those areas was not Yahweh. That the Jewish people even associated assassins with potheads should show their lack of direct experience with the substance.

    Cups of intoxicants were used in the eastern religions but the bible is clearly against “strong drink”. The Greek word for ‘witchcraft’ is ‘pharmakia’ which identifies what both Jew and Christian consider the use of drugs to be.

    Nevertheless neither group “outlawed” cannabis and shouldn’t be ostracized for holding a contrary view of drug use. Certainly people in all ages have been exposed to drugs for both medicine and entertainment purposes and no church outlawed its use, even when coffee was forbidden by both Catholics and Moslems.

    Pot is illegal today because rich tobacco and textile merchants want it to be. Thinking you can convince Christians to go against their conscience with invalid and unprovable theories won’t get you anywhere. Most are opposed to smoking as an unhealthy practice as much as they frown on intoxication. Christians will support decriminalization of pot because they have been shown that otherwise is unjust, not because of a belief that Jesus was a pothead. Presently I would say most Christians are indifferent to the legal plight of pot smokers since they don’t generally partake and therefore change of status is not important.

  5. francis gerard on

    who is this ‘anonymous’ prick anyway??

    can someone (webmaster?) please ban and/or beat the living shit out of this cowardly harper shill?!

    i come here to support and be supported by the cannabis community, NOT to be subjected to this asshole’s bullshit.

    please, just ban the fucking idiot already. he’s only here to troll and be disruptive, nothing else.

    get rid of him already

  6. Anonymous on

    RIGHT ON. And where’s the “wisdome”, you autistic ‘tard? The temple where you keep your pea-sized-brain? LOL

  7. Anonymous on

    This potcast was so wonkish I had to shut it off. Next time please give us something to the point we can actually listen to. What kind of stimulant drugs are they feeding you in that place?

  8. Anonymous on

    honest debate about modern topic of drug reform
    standing up for what I believe
    Now is there anything else ?

    PS not everybody tagged as anonymous is the same person
    there seem to be at least a half dozen different anonymous posters
    did you notice they all have different points of view ?

  9. jodie on

    Marc has always been passionate, fast-spoken, articulate, and zealous in his speeches and commentary. Nothing has changed by not smoking pot — and besides, Marc and I would often go all day long without smoking, only enjoying a few tokes before bed. So again, you demonstrate your ignorance and idiocy. You still haven’t answered my repeated questions — why are you here on the website of someone you dislike so much, Mr. obsessive anonymous?

  10. Anonymous on

    By the way, if you are so foolish as to think that there is no access to marijuana on the “inside” of a provincial jail, the only thing which exceeds your boorish preaching is your wilful naiveté

    Do you know from experience or just from watching cop shows on TV ? However Mr Emery will not be residing in a
    ” provincial jail” he will be an inmate of a Federal Prison in the USA–

    so what is your point Mr Emotional clarity
    & logical and intuitive insightedness??

    You smoke some kush and then go to bed,
    this is a spiritual experience to you?
    To everybody else in the world
    that is referred to as ” going to sleep “

  11. fatigues on

    Oh please. :roll eyes:

    I smoke three or four times a week before bed. While I am the first to admit that verbal eloquence is rarely a side-effect of cannabis, emotional clarity and both logical and intuitive insight are often increased under the influence of cannabis. That’s why cannabis is often referred to as a spiritual experience by many users. But, you didn’t come here looking for truth, did you? You believe you have already found it – and so stopped looking for new truths and insights long ago, I wager.

    In any event, any deleterious effects from a bowl of kush are gone after a relaxing night’s sleep. One’s mind is not appreciably cleared any further by a longer deprivation, contrary to your doubtless *vast* personal experience with marijuana.

    By the way, if you are so foolish as to think that there is no access to marijuana on the “inside” of a provincial jail, the only thing which exceeds your boorish preaching is your wilful naiveté.


  12. Anonymous on

    Indeed. 30 days w/o smoking major hourly bongs hits has cleared his mind from crunchy drug cobwebs,, his pure manic rage is evident now w/o the narcotising effect of a powerful mood numbing drug grade cannabis he self medicates with. You bet he’s ” Seeing Devils ”

    We imagine there will be a few more hurricane outbursts till the THC scale is scraped off his brain.. Take a life lesson stoners.. the minute you quit pot it will release a Tornado of muted emotions you haven’t been brave enough to deal with.. watch Marc Emery lab animal sorry example .. as you can see for yourself, being so hard wired to pot intoxication and never coming down is not a good thing. a classic case of excessive compulsive behavior that exploded.. Being an old drunk- being an old stoner- whats the difference in the end ?

    and to think he sold a million seeds so a million other people could be that fucked up.. Now watch a 52 year old teenager over throwing up on the government..

    Don’t let it happen to you

  13. Anonymous on

    A remarkably well written appraisal of the Conservative Party of Canada and their legislative agenda. It appears that Marc Emery has found a good use for his free time.

    I have heard Marc speak publicly on several occasions. I have read his magazine, his forum posts, his blog posts and heard him on the radio many times.

    Never has he been as focused, well written, logical or persuasive as he is in this podcast. It succeeds because it is *not* confined to the subject of marijuana; rather, because marijuana and drug policy is merely integrated into a much broader narrative.

    Very well done.

  14. Anonymous on

    well Princess of Pot– answer this guy asap
    we are awaiting your wisdom

  15. George Lenard on

    But it is not Christian to put your brother in jail for growing personal quantities of marijuana? But that is what the neo right Christian Brotherhood would do! Why? The neo right would send its country’s sons to fight a for the rights of those that ship heroin to addict the sons and daughters left at home! You, can salt it! You can sugar it. You can lie, deny and re-blame, but you cannot make such actions Christian no matter how hard you try!!!!!!!

  16. jodie on

    Marc is very close to his brothers and sister, and they love him dearly just as he loves them. Marc and I spend time with all three of his siblings every year, and they all wish they could do something more to help. Who are you and why do you talk such nonsense?

  17. jodie on

    Everything you’ve written, all of your high-and-mighty blabber about “Christian Evangelical Minister brother saved his ass” nonsense, is WRONG.

    When Marc got arrested the bail was set at $50,000. Marc has no money beyond the business bank accounts, so we were able to get $10,000 from the store account and needed another $40,000 in sureties. A surety is property instead of money for bail — it’s typical procedure.

    Marc’s brother Matthew, who is NOT a Christian Minister, offered to have his home used as surety along with three of Marc’s friends. He and the others lost nothing and were more than happy to help.

    Marc’s brother Stephen was a Christian minister, but he’s NOT evangelical nor was he a life-long minister. He was minister of an Anglican church for a while, and now runs a religious book and gift shop. He had offered Marc sanctuary in his church, but Marc doesn’t want to hide in a church so he politely refused.

    So you’re wrong, Mr. Anonymous. Stop talking like you know the facts — you’re nobody with no knowledge, just a lot of gossip and hearsay.

  18. Anonymous on

    Marc Emery wrote in the blog that begins this blog

    ” Stephen Harper’s demented vision of Canada’s future as a Neo-Conservo-Christian paradise”

    Its ironic that a Neo-Conservative Christian paradise worker loved him enough in spite of contrasting opinions to have bailed him out-

    Actually its hilarious and sad at the same time-

    Marcs’ bail fees were not just lunch money anybody could afford- His big brother put up his family bail- at great risk to his own family so that marc scott emery, this own little brother-= who routinely breaks and scoffs at the law, and who is demonstratably _not a good risk for a bail bond at all.—.could walk free, Marcs freedom from 2005-2009 was due to his big brother- not anybody else…not even himself

    There is no rule, law or requirement for a family member to risk all for a family member in jail- in fact many families will NOT bail out a member who is an asshole offender-or – anybody at all- who will likely reoffend–and thus forfeit their home to the state, mercy is not mandatory – but it is appreciated

    Putting up bail was an act of love by someone whom marc openly and publically scorns- and continues to scorn as you can read above for yourself His brothers gift is specially tender when Marcs own stoner commandos would not put up his bail- and they could easily afford who _did bail out his sorry ass ????
    > a neo-Conservative Christian Paradise worker- aka his own big brother, the fundimental Christian minister. What thanks does he get? none- just crapped on, in public for no good reason by Marc Scott Emery ..his own ungrateful scofflaw wise ass little brother– in big trouble with the cops yet again

    Marc Emery, the self styled Prince of Pot was not a victim of the Drug Wars- he was a willing fulltime openly belligerent activist scoff law in the drug wars- who made millions of dollars from selling contraband in the drug wars.. and according to the RCMP and the DEA a major Criminal mastermind- certainly not your average 17 year old stoner picked up by the cops on a Saturday night with some loose joints..

    Marc is a grown up and as much as he claims to be his own man- note his ass is saved courtesy of his big brother- the neo Conservative Fundimentalist Christian Minister. Its both funny and sad.

  19. Jordon Emery on

    Being an adopted son Marc gives me more intimate knowledge on the issue of Marc being imprisoned. I feel loss in my heart that this has happened to Marc yet at the same time this is what Marc wanted his whole life. He’s defied the law all his life and it seems the goal of his life over the past twenty years or more has to be imprisoned for whatever reason, whether it being the sale of Two Live Crew’s Nasty as they Wannabe or the sale of Marijuana seeds to the US. All of his causes have been in the name of freedom in one way or another, his objectives are sometimes self centered and ego driven but nonetheless they speak for the rights of all people. I remember when Marc first took up the Marijuana cause in Vancouver shortly after he lost all our money in Indonesia; he went at this cause full bore and has never looked back. Yes Marc has his faults and isn’t always right but that’s not the issue, the issue is that the war on drugs is never going to work and Marc being jailed for his crimes is further proof of that. When I read comments about Marc having his Christian/Minister brother paying his bail and how wrong that is because of Marc’ feelings on Christianity, I can’t help but think to myself that the person commenting has no real understanding of family or justice. Families are allowed to have differences of opinions and still love/help one another. For instance I believe 9/11 was an inside job but Marc doesn’t, does this mean he shouldn’t help me when I’m in trouble? I know that’s a little off point but I don’t understand what you’re trying to convey when you say “let’s not forget that marc Emerys bail was paid by his brother- a fulltime, life long Evangelical Christian minister, He put up his family home so his scofflaw little brother could be free”. Please tell me, shouldn’t have his brother helped him in his time of need, is that what you’re trying to say? Then on the other side of the comments we have people talking about how Marijuana is the be all and end all of most everything our world is based. I don’t believe Marijuana is really an answer to anyone’s personal problems (except of course for those who use it medicinally ie for HIV, cancer and so on), nor do I believe that it can expand your mind, I certainly don’t like smoking it anymore but I’m not opposed to those who do smoke it. Pot is a plant as is the Opium Poppy and though both have their healing powers; they also both have their drawbacks. I know people that can’t go a single day without smoking pot, they are what I call mentally addicted. I can’t go a day without Methadone because I was addicted to Heroin (which is derived from Opium). I guess what I am trying to say is that we shouldn’t expect pot to save the world nor should we expect pot to destroy it, we’ve been given this plant by nature and to use it correctly can help us in many ways, such as making clothes, paper, fuel and more. However, allowing pot to consume your entire life can be harmful, it drains money, can cause negative effects on some peoples personalities and it can lead to legal problems. Of course the answer to the last problem (that of the legal one) is to decriminalize Marijuana, there’s no reason for it to be illegal. There is however more reason why tobacco and alcohol should but then again it comes down to personal choice, we all have the power to choose what we do with our lives and I think the best we can all do is be civil to one another, respect others opinions and try to show others what you deem as the truth. Marc doesn’t deserve to be imprisoned but it is what he wanted, he loves the limelight but I fear he doesn’t know how terrible the American prison system is. I can only hope our government will see the error of their ways and keep Marc out of the hands of the American prison industrial complex.

  20. Danger Dan on

    This is a pro pot liberation blog
    why aren’t you growing pot?
    it pays big money for a five month stints of labour
    there is no background check
    you are experienced working with losers
    you seem morbidly attracted to the drug culture
    you have the right dull perception of the outside world to succeed

    so there you go pal

    get some lights and “nutes
    and join the criminal underclass
    and help keep marc Emery company
    you are better off with a sack of batshit
    than a loaded weapon anyway..

    all the leads you will ever need are winking at you on both sides of this slate- seeds- lights, nutes, bongs..hash making machines

    now be a man and do what you are told
    go forth and break the law
    and wrap up your career in a correctional institute
    in any one of Canadas’ ten provinces and two territories..

    its just a plant
    and its only a jail cell

  21. Danger Dan on

    // Where did you get THAT figure? //

    This blog is about the marc Emery podcast
    but before we go any farther
    lets ask some questions of the questioner- ( thats you )

    Marc Emery, do you know who he is?
    -Do you know what a podcast is?
    _Do you know what this podcast is about?
    _Do you speak English?
    -Can you do math?
    _ Are you retarded?
    _ Did you listen?
    _Can you listen
    _ will you listen?

    this recent Marc Emery ( see Wikipedia ) or email Jodie Emery and she will tell you- THIS podcast of Marcs’ proposed the cash figures for the annual cannabis market as anywhere between EIGHT BILLION & FOURTEEN BILLION DOLLARS;; so ys, thats where I got these figures,, the ( duh ) reference we are discussing & evaluating right at this moment

    so my source is Marc Emery himself
    so yes, that is pretty amazing precision of numbers

    thank you,
    now fuck off wipehead goof

  22. Anonymous on

    That would be your Bill-15 Alarm Clock going off in your jail cell Chris

  23. o on

    ..anyway, i applied to join the forces because i can’t get a job because of all the shit in my police files.

    like i can’t get a job, and if i do they take it away from me pretty damn quickly. i have never held a job for more than 7 months, and prolly never will, not my decision…

    so i apply to join the forces, they tell me to quit smoking pot and come back later, fine, no problem, not addictive whatsoever and going without is no biggie.

    so now, all that is left to deal with is the lies in my files.
    my interview is tuesday, no thursday.
    it should be a quick and easy interview, ( most people that go there are basically retards and losers, it is quite remarkable really…. …. but listen, no matter where i go i always end up surrounded by losers, they are everywhere!)

    here’s the kicker – the military is a separate entity from society. they have their own files and 100% completely and totally quarantined from civilian influence.

    i get the feeling that there are going to be many people in the police, rcmp, health canada … etc, that are going to be asked to explain all those lies ……

    there will be much squirming, and none of it will be me….

    i can’t decide if i should join.
    i can’t decide
    i don’t want to, but nobody else will give me a job.

    but, in the end, i think i will, because i like food
    and i need money for food, and money comes from working, and i can only work for the people that destroyed me in the first place…

    so in conclusion
    i can’t get any job because i have a police record
    but i can get top secret military clearance …..


  24. Anonymous on

    If we are all divine, then doesn’t ;that reduce the notion of divinity
    as something special to a very common, run of the mill,
    no big deal sort of thing ?

  25. chrisbennett on

    Don’t worry little troll, wake-up time is coming!

  26. Anonymous on

    NOT just Harper was for a ‘reform’ of the senate, the Reform Party had this as a, perhaps THE, cornerstone of their platform. And you’re right they couldn’t walk their cheep talk. I knew back then that they were no different than any other corrupt politicos. Harper proved this by his recent patronage appointments to the senate. dishonest rat slime, yes. If Manning had won a majority he would of proved it way back then. I’m laughing at their pathetic mandate whatever it is!

  27. Alvin the Chipmonk on


  28. chrisbennett on

    My lawyer, Kirk Tousaw, and I have been preparing for our Nov. 3 appearance in Federal Canadian court regarding are religious challenge for a cannabis exemption. Below are documents prepared from Professors, two of whom are slated to appear as expert witnesses in the case:


    In the matter of




    My name is C. SCOTT LITTLETON, Ph.D., Professor of Anthropology, Emeritus, Occidental College, Los Angeles, CA 90041, U.S.A. My home address is… [not included here]. I attach my Curriculum Vitae as Exhibit 1. I make this affidavit of my own personal knowledge.

    I am a cultural anthropologist who has studied human magico-religious behavior, mythology, and folklore since the late 1950s, and, in the course of this study, have frequently had occasion to research the religious and spiritual use of cannabis and other psychotropic drugs. As an example of this research, I can cite my article, “The Pneuma Enthusiastikon: On the Possibility of Hallucinogenic ‘Vapors’ at Delphi and Dodona.” Ethos 14:76-91, 1986, which concerns the possibility that, in ancient times, cannabis fumes were inhaled by the Pythia at Delphi, thus permitting her to enter a trance state and make prognostications. Indeed, it was this article that prompted Mr. Bennett to contact me re his research into the ritual use of cannabis in Vedic India and elsewhere in the ancient world.

    I have read Mr. Bennett’s several books on this subject and am in general agreement with what he states, especially about the extent to which the Vedic hallucinogen Soma was probably made from cannabis. Indeed, his research has changed my own thinking about this ancient conundrum (heretofore, the majority of scholars have suggested that Soma was prepared from psychotropic mushrooms).

    As Mr. Bennett has amply demonstrated, the ritual use of cannabis has a very long history, both in the Old and New Worlds. For example, in addition to its use at Delphi and in the ancient Indian Soma cult, as well as by shamans, both ancient and contemporary, in many parts of the world, we know from both Herodotus (Book Four) and archaeology that the ancient Scythians ritually inhaled cannabis fumes. Herodotus, who may have been an eye-witness, called it a ritual “smoke bath,” during which the participants “howled like wolves,” and burned hemp seeds have been found in braziers at several Scythian sites in Central Asia and Western Siberia, most notably at Pazyryk (near Novosibirsk).

    In more recent times, and especially in the twentieth century, users of cannabis for spiritual purposes have often been persecuted, in the United States and elsewhere, by authorities enforcing laws against its possession. A good example can be seen in the ongoing attempts to suppress its use in the Rastafarian religion, in which cannabis plays a major albeit illicit ceremonial role.

    In short, cannabis has indeed occupied an extremely important position in the history of human spirituality, one that has all too often been overlooked (or ignored) by those authorities who are adamantly opposed to its use, no matter what the context.


    SWORN BEFORE ME, a Notary Public, in the City of South Pasadena,
    CA, U.S.A., this 28th day of October, 2009.


    File Number:

    Vancouver Registry











    I, Thomas Bradford Roberts, Ph.D, of [… not included here]

    1. My name is Thomas B. Roberts, and I make this statutory declaration from personal knowledge of the matters and facts stated in it. I am a Professor Emeritus of Educational Psychology at Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL. USA, where I have been employed since 1970.

    2. Area of Expertise. As evidenced by my vita and from my faculty website (attached exhibit), I would like to draw the court’s attention to my professional publications in religious studies and scholarly duties having to do wholly or in part with the spiritual uses of psychoactive plants and chemicals.

    Note: the word entheogen refers to a psychoactive plant or chemical used in a spiritual or religious context.


    a. 1970-2006. Professor of Educational Psychology, Northern Illinois University. Duties: teaching undergraduate and graduate courses, serving on and chairing master’s theses and doctoral dissertations

    b. Fall 2006. Visiting Scientist, Behavioral Pharmacology Research Unit, Johns Hopkins Medical Institute, Baltimore, MD. Duties: lead weekly staff development session and consulted on psilocybin research project.

    c. Spring 2007 – present. Professor Emeritus instructor for the Honors Program seminar Foundations of Psychedelic Studies, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL.


    d. (2009 or 2010 in-press). Entheogenic Contributions to Self-Transcendence, Healing, Pastoral Counseling, and Evangelism. Chapter 11 in Harold Ellens (ed.) The Healing Power of Spirituality, Vol. 3. Westport, CT. and London: Praeger/Greenwood Publications.

    e. (2008). Multistate and Entheogenic Contributions to the Study of Miracles and Experimental Religious Studies. Chapter 3 in Harold Ellens (ed.) Miracles: God, Science, and Psychology in the Paranormal. Westport, CT. and London: Praeger /Greenwood Publications.

    f. (2007). Winkelman, M. & T. Roberts (eds.) Psychedelic Medicine: New Evidence for Hallucinogenic Substances as Treatments, 2 vols. Westport, CT. and London: Praeger/Greenwood. [Ten chapters are primarily about the religious and/or spiritual uses of these substances.]

    g. (2006). Chemical Input, Religious Output—Entheogens: A Pharmatheology Sampler. Chapter10 in Patrick McNamara (ed.) Where God and Science Meet, Vol. 3. Westport, CT. and London: Praeger/Greenwood Publications.

    h. (2004). Entheogens—Sacramentals or Sacrilege? Design for a University Course. [Originally presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion, October 22-24, 2004, Kansas City, MO.] Retrieved Oct. 13, 2009, from

    i. (2001). (ed.). Psychoactive Sacramentals: Essays on Entheogens and Religion. San Francisco: Council on Spiritual Practices.

    j. (1999). Do Entheogen-induced Mystical Experiences Boost the Immune System? Psychedelics, Peak-experiences, and Wellness. Advances in Mind-Body Health, Vol. 15, pp. 139-147.

    k. (1995-2003). with Hruby, P. J. (eds.) Religion and Psychoactive Sacraments: An Entheogen Chrestomathy. [An online archive of over 550 entries including excerpts and expanded bibliographic information.]

    l. (1997). Academic and Religious Freedom in the Study of the Mind. Chapter 11 in Robert Forte (ed.). Entheogens and the Future of Religion. San Francisco: Council on Spiritual Practices.

    m. (1995). Psychoactive Sacraments. Valombrosa Conference Retreat Center, Menlo Park, CA. [A conference-retreat jointly sponsored by the Chicago Theological Seminary and the Council on Spiritual Practices. Co-organizer, program chair, floor manager.]

    n. Co-founder and former director of the Council on Spiritual Practices.

    o. Additional items will be found in my vita 1970-2006 and at my faculty website 2006-present.

    3. Does marijuana (cannabis) have religious use?

    a. A search of the website of the Council on Spiritual Practices and its 550-entry archive Religion and Psychoactive Sacraments (item k above) discovers 70 citations, and this archive does not include journal, periodical, or press citations, which probably outnumber the books and dissertations of this archive. Some of these entries are against the spiritual use of marijuana, a few are neutral, but most recognize this practice as spiritually legitimate. Regardless of the positions taken, the existence of these entries as a whole indicates that the topic has recognized status within the religious community and in religious studies and is not to be dismissed lightly. Also, new entries to this source stopped in 2003; and as the compiler of that resource who has kept file folders of possible future additions, I expect additional books and academic dissertations on the religious uses of marijuana published since then would probably number several dozen.

    b. In On Being Stoned: A Psychological Study of Marijuana Intoxication, written by Charles T. Tart, Ph.D. and published in 1971 (Science and Behavior Books, Palo Alto, Ca.), Chapter 19 is titled “Spiritual Experiences.” This chapter reports the results of four questions that were part of a 224-item survey of marijuana users.

    Item 192: “I feel in touch with a Higher Power or Divine Being to some extent when stoned: I feel more in contact with the ‘spiritual’ side of things.”

    22% responded “very often” or “usually”.

    Item 193: I am able to meditate more effectively than when straight …”

    13% reported “very often” or “frequently”

    Item 194: “I have had spiritual experiences, discrete experiences, which have had a powerful long-term religious effect on me while stoned.”

    33% answered “yes” to this item. When asked to elaborate on these experiences, their descriptions included feelings of unity, stimulation of long-term interest in religion, contact with divine beings, long-term positive changes in life-style, and deep peace and joy.

    Item 195: “Getting stoned has acquired a religious significance for me.”

    22 % answered “yes”

    c. In my judgement, Understanding Marijuana: A New Look at the Scientific Evidence, (2002, Oxford University Press) by Mitch Earlywine, Ph.D., provides the most thorough and thoughtful compilation of information on this topic. On pages 112-113, he writes, “The Coptic and Rastafarian Churches smoke cannabis as part of their religious practice, too. Certain sects of Buddhism in Nepal use marijuana as a sacrament (Clark, 1998). … Many encourage pensive, meditative use of the drug and deride mindless consumption (Bello, 1996). This approach to use may minimize the potential for negative consequences related to the drug.”

    To answer my question above, “Does marijuana (cannabis) have religious use?” My answer is, “Clearly, yes.” This is not to imply that all current marijuana use is religious; clearly it isn’t. But at the same time, some current use is religious and is spiritually significant to those using it that way.

    4. Is Christopher Bennett’s use religious and/or spiritual?

    Having exchanged emails with Christopher Bennett for several years, I met him personally at a conference in Vancouver in 2004. Since then we have continued to email. At that time, we discussed the spiritual-religious uses of cannabis, and I have read parts of his co-authored books Green Gold the Tree of Life, Marijuana in Magic & Religion and Sex, Drugs, Violence and the Bible. Having spent a large fraction of my professional work compiling information the entheogens (item k above), I am solidly impressed with the scholarship on Mr. Bennett’s two books., He and his co-authors present the religious and spiritual use of cannabis in what must have been the result of painstaking detailed research in archeology, anthropology, theology, and other contributory disciplines to religious studies.

    To me this also indicates a sincere belief on his part in the spiritual benefits of his use of cannabis. A casual, let’s-get-high smoker would not spend such tedious labors as these books required, and just as scholars within accepted religious traditions express their dedication and beliefs in, say, detailed historical or linguistic research, Mr. Bennett’s work witnesses the credibility of his convictions.

    In my judgment and considering the laborious process of writing a book, seeing it through its rewriting, editing, printing and publication, these activities are sufficient evidence of Mr. Bennett’s sincere dedication to his religious use of cannabis.

    Someone could merely claim that he or she smoked cannabis as part of one’s religion in order to try to circumvent the law, but a person with this motivation would not dedicate the hours of tedious work to writing books without a sincere belief that doing so is part of his spiritual dedication. And if circumventing the law were one’s purpose, it would not serve to call attention to oneself and one’s use of marijuana by writing books about marijuana.

    Summary: it is my opinion that Mr. Bennett’s practice of using cannabis is a sincere and significant part of his religious beliefs, and that prohibiting him from doing so is an interference with his religious freedom. In religious thought there exists a concept called “transgression in service of a higher good” (such as a doctor healing on the Sabbath); I hope the Court will recognize a similar exception for transgressing drug laws in Mr. Bennett’s spiritual use of cannabis.

    Respectfully submitted, __________________________________________

    Thomas B. Roberts

    Prepared by Prof. Carl Ruck, Classical Mythology, Boston University for the case, who will also be submitting an affidavit

    1. Have there been instances in history of religions and/or spiritual practices that used psychoactive substances in their worship? If so please cite examples.

    Psychoactive Sacraments are the Probable Origin of Religions.

    — Plant sacraments or shamanic inebriants evoking religious ecstasy or vision; commonly used in the archaic world in divination for shamanic healing, and in Holy Communion, for example during the Initiation to the Eleusinian Mysteries or the Vedic Soma sacrifice.
    Literally: becoming divine within.

    Evolutionary science has amassed much evidence that the ancestors of man were primate cousins living in the forests and grasslands of Africa. Religious origins certainly grew out of primitive man’s struggle to define and control his surroundings. Prehistoric man would have respected and hailed the elements such as lighting, thunder and fire for their frightening and destructive power; and he would also have had respect for powerful mind altering substances found in nature.

    Anthropological, ethnopharmacological and historical research has shown that the traditional purpose of such psychoactive plant use was to attain direct spiritual experience, during which users made contact with different spirits and unseen realms in order to gain knowledge and wisdom for themselves and/or members of their social group. Scientists studying aboriginal cultures with shamanic traditions have conclusively demonstrated that hallucinogenic substances were frequently used as an adjunct to the shamans’ inner quest for vision and the search for healing.

    The oldest organized continual religious tradition was that of the Indo-European Indian/ Iranian Magi, which arguably became the first monotheist religion (the precedent for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) through the revisions of the prophet Zarathustra (known to the Greeks as Zoroaster), perhaps as early as 6000 BCE, who was also credited with the transition from a nomadic culture of hunter-gatherers to the settled manner of civilization in urban centers with the arts of agriculture. Common to the Magi and their Zoroastrian successors (as well as the similar traditions of the Indian Brahmans) was the admittedly intoxicating botanical sacrament called haoma/soma. The identity of this plant or combination of plants has been the subject of scholarly debate. Candidates include mushrooms (Amanitas, Psilocybes), Syrian rue (Peganum harmala) potentiated by acacia—producing an Old World equivalent of ayahuasca, Ephedra, and Cannabis. The actual ingredients probably differed over the long history of the religion’s continual existence, but archaeological evidence can document Cannabis used in a ritual haoma ceremony as early as 2000 BCE at the sanctuary at Gunur in eastern Turkmenistan.

    Similar and apparently separate traditions of visionary sacraments are documented in Neolithic (ca. 6000 BCE) rock paintings, specifically from North African Tassili n’Ajjer and the southeastern Hispanic peninsula (Spanish Levantine) and from cave sites in southwestern France, as well as Siberia, South Africa, and Australia.

    In early historical times, one might cite the religious use of psychoactive substances among the Egyptians, early Judaism, Mesopotamian and Anatolian peoples (such as the settlement at Çatal Hüyük), and Classical Greece.

    Classical Greece (5th-century BCE) is of particular relevance since it is claimed as the ancestor and inspiration of the Western Tradition. The main Hellenic religion was the Eleusinian Mystery initiation, which grew out of earlier cults with their own traditions of psychoactive sacraments, including opium. The Eleusinian Mystery, celebrated in a village near Athens, began about 1500 BCE and lasted nearly two millennia, until supplanted by the conversion of the Roman Empire to Christianity. The religion induced a communal visionary event that was experienced as a journey to the otherworld and return by means of a sacred potion whose active agent was LSD extracted from ergot, a common fungus on cultivated grains.

    In addition, one of the principle deities of Classical Greece was the god Dionysus or Bacchus. He was a god of intoxication, music, and dance; and his sacred drink was wine, which was always correctly drunk diluted with water and fortified by varieties of psychoactive herbal additives. He is similar to deities of ecstatic rapture in other cultures, such as the Aztec Xochipili.

    The Persian version of the Vedic Soma sacrament was assimilated in the Greco-Roman world in the 1st century BCE as the cult of Mithras, which became one of the dominant religions of the Roman Empire, along with Christianity and the Egyptian Mystery of Isis. The religion originally of nomadic peoples from the Steppes of central Asia assimilated various aspects of the agrarian cults of the ubiquitous Goddess as it progressed through Mesopotamia and Anatolia, and similar versions of the cult involved Cybele and her lover Attis, and had already established itself even before the Classical Age in Greece through frequent contact with the Persian nobility and is seen in the traditions about the mythical hero Perseus, who is claimed as the ancestor of the Persians and is often indistinguishable from Mithras.

    Membership in the Mithraic cult was restricted exclusively to men, who met in small groups in confined subterranean sanctuaries, the remains of which are found throughout Europe, the Near East and Africa, where they celebrated their god and initiated new members with a seven-fold sequence of visionary psychoactive sacraments. The visionary experience was expressed through the philosophy of Stoicism and involved a liberating spiritual ascent to the rim of the Universe and the concept of Cosmic Renewal through the Final Conflagration at the End of Time.

    These sanctuaries are totally unsuitable for banqueting upon ordinary foods. As is often the case, other drugs appear to have been accepted as substitutes or surrogates for the original fungal identity of Soma, including the extract from ergot, under the descriptive metaphor of ass’s ears. Nero was the first Emperor to be initiated by what is called a series of magical dinners, and most of his successors including Constantine before his Conversion espoused the cult, along with the army and bureaucrats who administered the Empire, so that the mushroom cult could safely be called the drug that ‘civilized’ Europe, or more correctly, imposed the Greco-Roman tradition, displacing the Druids, with their psychoactive mistletoe, and other indigenous cults.

    Although officially banned after the Conversion, aspects of the religion were assimilated or co-opted by Christianity as the seven sacraments of the Church, and the warrior brotherhoods persisted as secret societies such as Freemasonry.

    Early Christianity, itself, had psychoactive Communion rites, which were condemned as heretical, by the dominant Church established by Paul, but evidence indicates that the ecclesiastical elite as late as the Renaissance had reserved the psychoactive Eucharist for themselves, and vigorously prosecuted such sacraments by so-called heretical groups like the Cathars, as well as perpetuations of pre-Christian practices by persons accused of witchcraft.

    The evidence for psychoactive sacraments among the pre-Conquest peoples of the New World is also relevant. In the 1950s R. Gordon Wasson’s investigations of the Mexican pre-Columbian mushroom cult established beyond question the prominence of hallucinogens in the religious exercises of the whole Mayan-Aztec culture. In addition to mushrooms, the Mesoamerican peoples employed such plants as San Pedro cacti and peyote. In many cases, even after the conversion to Christianity they assimilated their indigenous rites to the new imposed religion.

    2. Have there been instances in history of religions and/or spiritual practices that used cannabis in their worship? If so please cite examples.

    Hemp played a prominent role in the development of the religions and civilizations of Asia, the Middle East, Europe and Africa. The insights gained from the marijuana high by the ancient worshippers were considered to be of divine origin and the plant itself an “angel” or messenger of the gods. The sacramental use of marijuana predates written history and this tradition continues with diverse tribes in Africa, certain Hindu sects, Moslem fakirs and Sufis, Rastafarians, as well as modern Occultists and Pagans.

    The 5th-century BCE Greek Herodotus (4.73) documented the use of cannabis as a ritual sacrament by the Scythians for their funerals. Before that, the Greeks knew the plant by other names, such as ‘smoke.’ The comic dramatist Aristophanes parodied the Scythian rite in his Clouds (ca. 423), implying that philosophers like Socrates got their ideas by being ‘high.’ It was probably often an ingredient in the incenses burnt in holy sanctuaries.

    More relevant is the use of cannabis by the Jews to produce a similar psychoactive atmosphere in the Temple, where it was burned in an enclosed space as incense and also employed for anointing the sacred vessels, as well as the high priest himself, so that he could speak to Yahweh. By the account of Philo (20 BCE—50 CE), who was himself a Jewish High Priest:
    All inside is unseen, except by the High Priest alone, and indeed, he, though charged with the duty of entering once a year, gets no view of anything. For he takes with him a brazier full of lighted coals and incense, and the great quantity of vapor covers everything around it, beclouds the sight and prevents it from being able to penetrate to any distance. — Philo, De specialibus legibus, 1.13.72

    3. Are there benefits to existence of such religious/spiritual practices?

    Cicero said of the Eleusinian Mystery:
    For among the many excellent and indeed divine institutions that Athens has brought forth and contributed to human life, none, in my opinion, is better than those mysteries. For by their means we have been brought out of our barbarous and savage mode of life and educated and refined to a state of civilization; and as the rites are called “initiations,” so in very truth we have learned from them the beginnings of life, and have gained the power not only to live happily, but also to die with a better hope.
    Laws, II, xiv, 36.

    The god Dionysus as patron of the theater in Athens was largely responsible for the elevation of that city as the pinnacle of Classical culture. Further archaeological and literary studies of the use of psychotropic substances in ancient cult practices may well lead to the conclusion that the imaginary world of the stage would never have been possible without the use of psychotropic chemicals.

    Plutarch, in Table Talk, a sort of mock philosophical dialogue, discussed how Jewish sacraments of the pre-Christian era reflected the union of religious practices surrounding the god of Abraham with the public worship of Dionysus, the god of intoxication and ecstasy. According to Plutarch both gods were associated with the same delirium–inducing plants, both used similar symbols and sacred implements, both used music in the same manner during worship, and the priests wore garments very similar to those used in the worship of Dionysus. Plutarch even clamed there was a direct linguistic connection between the Hebrew word for Sabbath and the Greek Sabi, which was used to denote the crazed, intoxicated followers of Dionysus.

    The Native American Church, which is a Christian Church that assimilates pre-Christian traditions, has used its peyote sacrament as a treatment for alcoholic addiction. Similarly, the West African iboga plant, which is used in traditional religious initiations, has shown efficacy in treating heroine and cocaine addiction. Similar research with the visionary ayahuasca potion suggests its use in the treatment of addictions.

    4. Do the intoxicating affects of cannabis lend themselves to a feeling of spiritual transcendence?
    The classic experiment in this regard was conducted at Marsh Chapel at Boston University on Good Friday of 1962 with psilocybin (the active agent in Psilocybe mushrooms). The subjects were graduate degree divinity students and almost all reported experiencing profound religious experiences. The experiment was repeated with very similar results at Johns Hopkins University in 2006.

    The classic description of such an experience with mescaline (the active agent in peyote and a few other cacti and plants) is Aldous Huxley’s The Doors of Perception (1954). Here are a few excerpts:
    I was not looking now at an unusual flower arrangement. I was seeing what Adam had seen on the morning of his creation-the miracle, moment by moment, of naked existence.
    Istigkeit – wasn’t that the word Meister Eckhart liked to use? “Is-ness.” The Being of Platonic philosophy – except that Plato seems to have made the enormous, the grotesque mistake of separating Being from becoming and identifying it with the mathematical abstraction of the Idea. He could never, poor fellow, have seen a bunch of flowers shining with their own inner light and all but quivering under the pressure of the significance with which they were charged; could never have perceived that what rose and iris and carnation so intensely signified was nothing more, and nothing less, than what they were – a transience that was yet eternal life, a perpetual perishing that was at the same time pure Being, a bundle of minute, unique particulars in which, by some unspeakable and yet self-evident paradox, was to be seen the divine source of all existence.
    I continued to look at the flowers, and in their living light I seemed to detect the qualitative equivalent of breathing -but of a breathing without returns to a starting point, with no recurrent ebbs but only a repeated flow from beauty to heightened beauty, from deeper to ever deeper meaning. Words like “grace” and “transfiguration” came to my mind, and this, of course, was what, among other things, they stood for. My eyes traveled from the rose to the carnation, and from that feathery incandescence to the smooth scrolls of sentient amethyst which were the iris. The Beatific Vision, Sat Chit Ananda, Being-Awareness-Bliss-for the first time I understood, not on the verbal level, not by inchoate hints or at a distance, but precisely and completely what those prodigious syllables referred to. And then I remembered a passage I had read in one of Suzuki’s essays. “What is the Dharma-Body of the Buddha?” (‘”the Dharma-Body of the Buddha” is another way of saying Mind, Suchness, the Void, the Godhead.) The question is asked in a Zen monastery by an earnest and bewildered novice. And with the prompt irrelevance of one of the Marx Brothers, the Master answers, “The hedge at the bottom of the garden.” “And the man who realizes this truth,” the novice dubiously inquires, ‘”what, may I ask, is he?” Groucho gives him a whack over the shoulders with his staff and answers, “A golden-haired lion.”

    I recommended this book to a friend and colleague who has devoted many years to meditation under the guidance of a spiritual master. She said that this was exactly the goal that they were striving to attain.

    With regard to cannabis, I quote the following from the Reverend Ernie Gordon, who is not himself a user, but has had similar experience from what he calls ‘contemplation’:
    I was reasoning with a Rastafarian recently, and he told me that during his contemplative prayer sessions, he smokes marijuana and he has been discovering that he develops a wisdom that he cannot explain easily. Many Christian psychiatrists, who are experimenting with psychedelic drugs, request that it is better to take certain drugs within the sacramental rite, rather than looking to psychedelic drugs in terms of periodic recreational flirtations.
    It is evident that there is urgent need for dialogue between the Christian and Rastafarian theologians to discuss at a deeper level the use of marijuana in the religious ritual in order to aid the transcendental experience. I would also like to ask the Rastafarian theologian if he/she has similar transcendental experiences, which are as follows:

    a) There is a sense of oneness with God or the universe, combined with a transcendence of time and space.

    b) There is insight, a sense of mystery, and ineffability.

    c) There is a profound joy, peace, and a sense of rejoicing and there is a lasting effect on thinking and attitude, although sometimes the experience is transient.

    About the ritual use of ganja (cannabis) by the Rastafarians, I quote the following:
    Contrary to popular belief, pious Rastas do not smoke marijuana recreationally, and some (the canonical Ethiopian Orthodox and also the followers of certain classical Elders) do not use it at all. Most Rastafarian teachers, however, have advocated the controlled ritual smoking of “wisdomweed” both privately as an aid to meditation and communally from “chalice” pipes as an “incense pleasing to the Lord”. The argument is that ganja is the “green herb” of the King James Bible and that its use is a kind of shortcut version of traditional ascetical practice.

    5. Are you familiar with the Church of the Universe tenets?
    I know a few Church members, but my knowledge of the Church’s beliefs derives from their publications. They are a syncretistic religion, founded in 1969, encompassing the scriptures of various groups, not necessarily Christian. Some of their members are well versed in such writings. They espouse personal freedom, which they express through nudity. They tend toward Gnosticism (which means knowledge though direct encounter or experience with the divine, without any specific anthropomorphized persona). They claim to be restoring the cannabis ritual of ancient Judaism. Although the organization is egalitarian, the members sometimes assume titles of a traditional ecclesiastical hierarchy. Their main goal is to cause no harm, and request the same from others. Although the Rastafarians have a cannabis sacrament, they are not allied with that Church.

    6. Is there merit to the claims by Church of the Universe practitioners that cannabis is referred to in the bible and may have been used by Jesus Christ?
    Cannabis is called kaneh bosem in Hebrew, which is now recognized as the Scythian word that Herodotus wrote as kannabis (or cannabis). The translators of the bible translate this usually as ‘fragrant cane,’ i.e., an aromatic grass. Once the word is correctly translated, the use of cannabis in the bible is clear. Large amounts of it were compounded into the ointment for the ordination of the priest. This ointment was also used to anoint the holy vessels in the Inner Sanctum or Tabernacle (‘tent’). It was also used to fumigate the holy enclosed space. The ointment (absorbed through the skin) and the fragrance of the vessels (both absorbed by handling and inhaled as perfume) and the smoke of the incense in the confined space would have been a very effective means of administering the psychoactive properties of the plant. Since it was only the High Priest who entered the Tabernacle, it was an experience reserved for him, although as the chrism of priestly ordination it was probably also something experienced in a different way by the whole priesthood. This same psychoactive chrism was later used for the coronation of the kings.

    The democratized use of a psychoactive sacrament, however, is the magical food called manna. When one ate it, one’s eyes were opened and one saw God. Moses was said to have sustained his people on this magical food for their long sojourn in the desert. Various candidates for it have been proposed, and the most likely identity is something like LSD, derived from ergot, a common fungus on grains.

    Jesus was probably trained as an Essene before the years of his proselytizing. The Essenes were known as healers and had extensive knowledge of drug plants. It is highly likely that Jesus experienced psychoactive sacraments. Since healing medicines were commonly compounded as oils, it is quite probable that the healing performed by Jesus involved administering the traditional Essene herbal pharmaceuticals, which would have, and in fact did on the basis of archaeological remains, included cannabis. One must remember also that the gospel account of his ministry is partly mythologized and certainly reworked from earlier documents. Healings recorded as miracles may well have involved skills of a physician.

    Additionally, Jesus was called the ‘Christ,’ which means that he was ‘anointed.’ The chrism of his anointment would have been the one described above for the Jewish ordination, which is to say, Jesus would have to have experienced the effect of cannabis. The biblical account of this chrismation is the encounter with John the Baptist at the River Jordan. It is the effective cause of the ensuing vision of the opened heavens, which can only be termed a mystical experience. The bible also seems to state that Jesus did not abide by the traditional reservation of this ointment for the priests and the elite, but that he shared it with the commonality of his followers.
    You have an anointing from the Holy One, and all of you know the truth. The anointing you received from him remains in you, and you do not need anyone to teach you. But as his anointing teaches you about all things, as that anointing is real, not counterfeit—just as it has taught you, remain in him. —I John 2:27.
    It is the common Gnostic pattern that the experience of the psychoactive sacrament confers Knowledge.

    As for the use of psychoactive sacraments by the early converts to Christianity, there were various forms of the communal meal or Eucharist, and archaeological evidence indicates that at least some of the meeting halls were intended for rituals of chemically altered consciousness. As Christians or followers of the Anointed One, the chrism prescribed in the bible would be an obvious choice, although other ‘drugs’ borrowed from other competing religions would also be involved.
    7. Do you agree with the following: When people migrate to a new country they bring their belief systems. Sometimes, initially, there is conflict between their belief systems and the prevailing culture/belief system in the new country. But over time, it is not uncommon for elements of the migrant’s belief systems to be poached by new belief systems in the new country.

    It is common for new religions to assimilate traditions from the religions they supplant. They often in previous times did this by building their new places of worship in the same place as the former, even using remnants of the previous structures in their new temple.
    Thus, above the desecrated sanctuary of Eleusis sits the little Christian chapel where the Blessed Virgin is worshipped as the Panaghia Mesoporitisa, the ‘Holy Lady who resides within the seed of grain.’ It is a common epithet elsewhere throughout Greece, perpetuated with little thought of the more ancient Goddess it perpetuates. In Athens, the Byzantine church that stands beside the looming modern cathedral was constructed from stones purloined from ancient temples and the Panaghia here, as elsewhere, bears the title of Gorgoepikoös, not the ‘All-hearing Lady,’ as it is claimed, but the ancient ‘Gorgon Queen, who harkens to our prayers.’ In some places, an actual Gorgon head is found buried beneath the Christian altar. Similarly, throughout the British Isles, the old Celtic goddess known as Sheila-na-gig as the entrance into sacred space was used as an ornament above the doorways of Christian churches.

  29. Nexus_25920 on


    The Hitlers among us are not the problem; there are very few really evil men overall.
    The issue at hand, or well out of hand, is rather the countless millions of ostrich-minded lemmings that follow the proverbial leaders.

    All leaders are bought and paid for, simply a puppet.
    There are many levels ‘Above the President’ for a real reason, to keep we the sheeple ignorant and compliant.

    Alas, so long as Britney Spears antics, curb appeal and automotive horsepower entertains and distracts we deserve the leaders we have fallen for.

    Unity we stand, divided we fall, over and over again until we, if ever, live for ourselves.

    Stop The Insanity.

  30. Blind Sinner on

    thats great Chris- then we’ll watch it Youtube and that will be that.
    Afterall Youtube was inspired by pot, and so is the couch we sit on..
    There is only pot across the universe. nothing else, just infrastructure to prop pot reality up..

    With Emery & Malmo Levine gone up the river you are the leader now Chris – Congratulations for going off to court without fighting criminal drug charges to prove your point – thats a huge advance- bravo..

    pot got you where you are today.. thats no lie

  31. chrisbennett on

    How about “no marijuana equals no religion”, cannabis – the once and future Tree of Life – provided the inspiration for Judaism, Christinaity, Taoism, Hinduism, Islam,and thereby all the religions that grew out of them.

    Man created those religions, but the great Spirit is the source of all life,including Plants.

    Cannabis – Soma, Haoma, the plant of immortality, the Green Khizr, keneh Bosem, is the alpha and omega of the world’s oldest existing religions.

    That is what I will show the supreme court with the aid of Professor of Classical Mythology Carl Ruck (also a linguist), Professor of Anthropology Scott Littleton and Professor of Psychology Tom Roberts.

  32. Anonymous on

    “The Ballad Of Peter Pumpkinhead”

    Peter Pumpkinhead came to town
    Spreading wisdom and cash around
    Fed the starving and housed the poor
    Showed the vatican what gold’s for
    But he made too many enemies
    Of the people who would keep us on our knees
    Hooray for Peter Pumpkin
    Who’ll pray for Peter Pumpkinhead?
    Oh my!

  33. Anonymous on

    Thanks to Marc for revealing how Harper is a two faced muhfugga. He was against the partisan appointed Senate when he was trying to get elected, then once he was elected it was politics as usual.

    In regard to Marc’s Christian brother bailing him out, I guess that shows how loyal all the Cannabis people he gave thousands of dollars to are when it comes time for HIM to need a donation. He just threw that 4 million away on a bunch of ingrates. Lesson learned, huh Marc? You should have written up a contract that all those people would have to chip in and bail you out when you got locked up for breaking the law to give them money (and finance your lavish lifestyle). Those are known as “fair weather friends”, Marc. They’re all your best buddies while you’re doling out the booty and then they don’t seem to be around when you need help. More important for them to buy their next ounce.

    Ever hear of a hole in the ground, Marc? It’s a good place to stick a million drug dollars for a rainy day, where the cops can’t seize it. Then you get a trusted friend who has lots of legal money to dig it up and bail you out with it and then give you the rest to escape the country with. As it is, you got hung out to dry by your temporary friends and you actually have to do the prison time, unlike Neville Schoenmaker who had some sense and didn’t throw all his money away. He’s still walking around free and you’re in stir. Never heard of the Boy Scout’s motto, did you Marc?

  34. techcafe on

    it’s remarkable how canadian politics has become so divisive & ugly, ever since the Harper Regime seized power & control of our government.

    typical conservative strategy; divide & conquer your political rivals, split the centre/left, then strike the moment the neocons smell blood.

    Harper’s Conservatives are absolutely *desperate for a majority* government; that much we do know, and Canadians ought to be asking ourselves… WHY??

    what does Harper hope to gain by annihilating the other political parties? is advancing their conservative agenda more important to Harper’s neocons than the interests and values of Canadians? apparently so.

    if we allow them to gain a majority government, then Canada is in deep shit, for everyone knows, power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely – especially when placed in the callous hands of an ‘ugly’ conservative government.

  35. Anonymous on

    thanks! have fun on the sidewalk, be sure to wave as we go by with our
    ” Honk if you love Jesus” signs

  36. S.Hoobler on

    Have fun on your road to perdition, christian-boy, lol.

  37. Thine Thee and That's all folks ! on

    so, no marijuana , no enlightenment ?
    the Supreme Court is gonna love that one

  38. Brian Kerr on

    Vote GREEN.

  39. chrisbennett on

    Silly hater, we are all divine, your divinity is just covered in the muck of your own hate, clean it off, take of the forbidden fruit, and let thine eyes be enlightned.

  40. Inuvikphil on

    Just a reminder to everyone reading, the Liberals are no better than the Conservatives here, having voted overwhelmingly in favour of the recent conservative crime bill C-15

    I asked Justin Trudeau about legalization and C-15; he denies ever smoking marijuana with Marc Emery. (Marc, please tell me you have a picture! ha ha)

    As you can see, he’s repeating some false talking points about mariuana being “not a light drug,” etc…

    Here’s the link:

  41. Zackariahookah on

    I reiterate, moralism. kills. freedom. think about that, and an answer may be found.

  42. Jumpin' Jack Flash on

    So if jesus owes his divinity to pot, why aren’t you divine Chris??
    You smoke enough to to qualify

  43. Anonymous on

    A “$12,000,000,000.00” market? Right down to the cent? That’s pretty amazing precision. Where did you get THAT figure?

    Are you sure you don’t need to add a couple more zeroes on there, just for good measure?

    You might also learn to spell “wisdom” before you display your lack thereof.

  44. chrisbennett on

    Ironically, Jesus was one of those pot heads you would feel justified in persecuting, just google “jesus cannabis” and see what comes up.

    Cannabis use is the source of numerous other religions

    A statement of fact we plan to establish in Federal Court

    Marc is a scapegoat for mean folks like you, and you are gonna find your own foul self bucked in the ass by the movement of which Marc was a leader…..

    Make way for the Tree of Life……

  45. Anonymous on

    Another great piece by Marc.

    In the U.S., the moralist crowd tends to have lots to repent for. The joke in the States is when you hear a politician campaigning based on “family values”, you can bet that politician will be a nightmare with regard to scandals.

    I could list many examples of such incidents but it’s better for people to pull up a search engine like Google and search for keywords such as…

    family values scandal
    family values hypocrite
    family values hypocrisy

    When it comes to most religious zealots, it’s an issue of “do as I say, not as I do.”

  46. Anonymous on

    You can always arrange to take Marcs place in jail yourself
    If you need help with the paperwork, just let me know : )

    You know its 100% true that Marc Christian Minister brother in London put up his bail-staked his modest family home so Marc could be fee. That personal sacrifice worked, ” Do unto others as ye would have them do unto you ” is the fundimental value of Christiantity that was deleted by the stoner pagan hoards glorying in their own murky intoxicated wonderfulness

    your wonderful cannabis community didn’t do much to save your Prince of Pot, not much except bitch bitch bitch . And your sacred holy weed of wisdome- a $ 12,000,000,000.00 annual black market industry and your selfish community of wipeheaded comrades didn’t pony up more than a little loose change and a lot of excuses, similar to your own.

    Too late now genius.. too late now


    Love and truth is Marcs sword, and with it, he will cut the throat of the liars and the theives that spew out the trash and has been for many years now, THATS WHY HES IN JAIL. His own government is scared of him!

    The truth is that our governments, both American and Canadian, hate us and want us all to shut up, lay down, and be quiet while they gang rape us all. If you cant see that, then you live in la-la land.

    May GOD bless everyone who loves freedom and want all people to be free from oppression. Help them up, dont hold out your hand and kick them in the face!

  48. Another Non-Violent Plant Smoker on

    I think that is the point here, nobody has been hurt! Marc is another non-violent, plant-smoking, child of God who has only partaken of, and shared plants given by HIM, and has been made out to be a criminal!!? Now tell me, WHERE IS THE LOVE IN THAT????

  49. Ian on

    Excellent potcast Marc; that is, aside from having to view a picture of that pasty-faced weasel.
    I hear too many Canadians speaking about what a good job Harper is doing – I suspect they have no idea what is really going on and are too Americanized, that is, dumbed down, to care.
    The so-called system that is being incorporated in Canada appears to be part of the larger plan – one of marginalization of those who will not genuflect before the dictators, the nickel-plated tyrants whose plans will never reach fruition.
    I hope to hear of your release sooner than later and will meditate on that.

  50. Jay Dell on

    AS a lover of JAH and The messiah Jesus as I AM A part.

    Love and truth prevail its the edge of the sword that Marc is getting cut with so he hates .

    LOVE THE trials and hardships for they bring in the end the respect and love to GOD,many need the fall from the horse to really get the picture.

    May God bless Marc and his Dear KIND brother.



  51. Worm on

    That’s what family does. Harper would prefer you turn your family over to the cops.


  52. steven hoobler on

    Oh Mr. Harper, don’t you have something more important to do other than visiting the cannabisculture site and taking potshots? lol, you loser.
    Keep your stupid head and comments in the nation’s capitol so the rest of us are less affected by your moronic ravings.

    Free Marc Emery – let Canada and Canadians be a nation and people that stands on it’s own, not some quasi-adjunct to the US doctrine of dominance via lies.

  53. Anonymous on

    let’s not forget that marc Emerys bail was paid by his brother- a fulltime, life long Evangelical Christian minister, He put up his family home so his scofflaw little brother could be free..