‘Herb School’ Activist Could Serve Time

CANNABIS CULTURE – Former Supreme Court of Canada Appellant and cannabis activist David Malmo-Levine will be sentenced on Wednesday, Oct. 28th at 9:30 AM at 222 Main St. in Vancouver.

Malmo-Levine, one of Vancouver’s most prominent cannabis activists, will be sentenced for his role in the “Herb School” herb-dispensing and drug-war history teaching operation that used to exist at 123 East Hastings St, next door to the Supervised injection site.

The Herb School operated for over three years without any complaints from neighbors, students or the Vancouver community – despite selling cannabis, mushrooms, botanical DMT extracts and small amounts of opium. The Herb School conducted daily drug-war history walking tours of old Vancouver as a requirement of access to purchasing herbs. The Herb School financed many political, educational and artistic pro-legalization projects with the profits from the herb sales.

Malmo-Levine, who is one of the youngest persons ever to stand before the Supreme Court of Canada self-represented (on cannabis distribution charges stemming from his “Harm Reduction Club”) now faces years in prison on charges of possession of cannabis, hashish and magic mushrooms for the purposes of trafficking. The Crown is requesting one year in jail for Malmo-Levine but was unable to enter evidence of any harm done by the activist during the sentencing hearing.

Malmo-Levine gained much support from the community, and received letters of support from many prominent doctors and drug policy researchers including Canadian Senator Pierre Claude Nolin, chairperson of the 2002 Senate Report on Cannabis – a report that recommended complete legalization of cannabis. Malmo-Levine also arranged expert testimony from Dr. Lester Grinspoon of Harvard Medical School during his sentencing hearing.

Click here for Malmo-Levine’s speech to sentence and a summary of all three days of his sentencing hearing.

David is a regular contributor to Cannabis Culture Magazine and Pot-TV. Read David Malmo-Levine’s Blog and check out his Pot-TV Show High Society.

Comments

44 Comments

  1. Danger Dan on

    // I sold about an ounce of opium for the 3 and 1/2 years I was in business. /

    and now you are going to jail

    // I only sold to adults with pain issues or who were addicted to heroin.//
    and now you are going to jail

    // What pain killer do you use? //

    a nap

    // Even aspirin has deaths involved with it.//

    well. then _ don’t put 200 asa tablets in a bottle of coca cola you asshole

    // How is selling a plant that does things safer and more effectively than aspirin a problem? //

    Five star douche delusion award for that one..
    you were selling a plant that can, does, has & will kill people..its called an ” overdose” Dave..setting up business right next door to a safe injection site and you didn;t notice the opiate fanclub streaming in & out? The nurses on staff are there to assist overdoses WHEN they occur, AS thy occur- not just IF they occur- thoverdi=oses occur on a regular basis-
    its all part of recreational drug surfing in the oceans of ignorance

    non medically prescribed opiate drugs produce way way WAY more overdoses and deaths than any fucking aspirin, smarten the fuck up Dave

  2. Anonymous on

    you are a piece of shit

    if you have nothing good to say
    don’t say shit

  3. Alvin the Chipmonk on

    The judge was no more impressed with your research than we were Dave Footnote do not a valid argument make

    You will have _plenty of time to redo your research
    in the BC Institute for Marijuana Martyrs

  4. Alvin the Chipmonk on

    yup. six months worth-
    the Judge was NOT impressed with Daves’ antics

    “: Nobody ever did from using marijuana
    & nobody ever died from being sent to jail ”

  5. Alvin the Chipmonk on

    Alvin was NOT the lamest of the Chipmonks- you lie ! maybe devote the rest of your life into answering your own questions about these drugs

    Three other wipeheads want to know- ooops make that two-
    DML has been assigned to another planet for six months to fight prohibition

    pot is just a plant and jail is just steel and concrete

  6. Anonymous on

    no body ever died from using cannabis
    & nobody ever did from being sent to jail

    take courage wipeheads- DML will return to lead you to uh… somewhere

  7. Anonymous on

    I think his analogies were in reference to oppression, something MLK Jr. fought relentlessly. Something that is obviously so prevalent that people will completely smash someone else’s opinion, activism, motivation, character and platform just to vent their own frustration.

    Good luck David.

    P.S. Human beings have the right to ingest any substance they so choose. Yes there are obviously consequences, both good and bad, but I seriously doubt other people lose sleep at night over those “drug addicts” and their “depraved” behavior that doesn’t align with the (shrinking) majority; not Alvin or any of the Anonymous bashing David and his upcoming unfortunate fate for dispensing happiness. Isn’t there something better to do with your time than spread negativity? Like battle the legality of tobacco or alcohol….both known killers.

  8. Anonymous on

    Why is alcohol legal?

    Why are cigarettes legal?

    Why is caffeine legal?

    You’re an idiot….and Alvin was always the lamest of the chipmunks.

  9. plink on

    Congratulations to Dave for having the self-reliance to sell mj, shrooms and organic opium in todays society. Government is made of its states people.

  10. PotSmokingCitizen on

    First off David like Marc Emery, is a self appointed leader of the legalization movement. Someone who’s taken it upon himself to champion a cause. It’s not true that ‘we stoners’ think of either of them as ‘our leaders’. In fact the majority of cannabis users probably haven’t heard of either of them.

    The fact of the matter is that the war on drugs is politically motivated BS. This is especially true when it comes to cannabis. A drug which is far safer and less harmful than alcohol or tobacco. I don’t mean to spout rhetoric, I’m just stating the facts as I see them.

    And consider the following..

    Cannabis is the single most medicinally useful plant know to man. Effective at treating a full range of conditions including aids, cancer, depression, mood disorders, autism, ADD, epilepsy & glaucoma.

    I would argue that all use is to some degree or other medicinal, even in primarily recreational users. Just as a beer drinker might have one or more beers to unwind after a stressful day, a cannabis user will light a joint for the same reason. I believe, this is refereed to as self-medicating in medical terminology.

    How does it make sense for society to promote alcohol, a toxic drug that makes users stupid and violent, while at the same time prohibiting cannabis a drug that by contrast makes users mellow and thoughtful and alleviates pain for so many people.

    Pot smokers are people from all walks of life lawyers, teachers, policemen, tradesmen and military to name a few. I personally know two guys who’ve enlisted in reg force. Both of whom were big pot smokers before joining and I hear from one that the military’s routine drug test had nearly half the battalion testing positive for cannabis last summer.

    How does any of this make sense? Who’s the government supposed to be protecting us from, ourselves?

    I know that as a police officer your duty is to enforce the law. However, I’d hope in the future you’ll be less inclined to stereotype pot users and try to be open minded to the idea that these laws are being used to further a political agenda. Maybe check out LEAP.

    Thanks,
    Matthew

  11. Anonymous on

    Quote: Until pot smokers are forced to go to their own schools, their own bathrooms, there own restuarents, beaten up for being a pot smoker, have rocks thrown at you ……

    Sounds pretty much like any common “Jailed for Pot situation” or otherwise “moral preaching fellow citicen acting out on own behalf” to me.

    Thus nothing “Until”, We are there already..

  12. Bob Malmo Levine on

    // I applaud David for his actions and would be proud to stand shoulder to shoulder with him //

    OK, can do- do you prefer the upper or lower bunk ?

  13. Alvin the Chipmonk on

    1) it’s not about rights for people. its special treatment for dope fiends

    2) it’s not a herb, its a vegetable drug

    thank you for correcting other peoples’ opinions with _your opinions
    we will always cherish them when those other people have long forgotten

  14. Alvin the Chipmonk on

    // How is selling a plant that does things safer and more effectively than aspirin a problem? //

    because you end up in fucking jail Dave–unless thats not a problem for you,, hold on while we get some Wikipedia footnotes for you.. OK heres one
    ” Jail”… a terrific place to write classic blues songs, experience same sex relationships, participate fully in the true Ghandi – Martil Luthor King- Nelson Mandella metaphysical experience..practise Time travel and material plane minimalism ( see: Birds, Alkatraz, Helter Skelter )..

    Just like marijuana, nobody died from going to jail

    What books from Amazon would you like us to send you Dave ?
    Nothing by DeQuincy or Cocteau, OK? No Billy Holiday music either

    How about a Vancouver Winter Olympics souvenir book?
    You can photoshop yourself into the protest crowd getting tear gassed
    when you get home

  15. Philip Night on

    here*

  16. Philip Night on

    Whether it is harmful or not is NOT the point. The primary goal hear the legalization of cannabis, the eventual, HOPEFUL goal (if you will), is just little to know government control at all. First you have to get pot legalized. You’re not going to get anything else unless the “evil weed” is no longer considered “evil”.

    IF YOU SELL OPIUM, YOU WILL BE CONSIDERED A DRUG DEALER. This is COUNTER PRODUCTIVE to what the legalization movement is about. I don’t care what your stance on opium is. And yes, there is hypocrisy — but that is not the point. The point is, in selling opium you are creating a harmful perception in the eyes of the majority. The inherent goal her is to CHANGE the perception of the majority. To convince them otherwise.

  17. PISSED-OFF AMERICAN on

    David was useing QUOTES from past oppessed people.Showing there justification for civil disobidience. This is the same justification for his/our disobeidience. The last time i checked, receiving 20 years in prison for the possesion of a substance is oppressive, and it happens every day.

    Was those past stuggles more important than this one today? Yes, but back in those times, most drugs were legal and we cannot honestly know for sure it wouldnt have been part of there struggles. This is whats left for us to fight for.We want a more perfect union, Canadians do too. We can only learn from the past and use those lessons to shape the future. Throwing people in jail for HUMAN NATURE is oppressive and it must be stopped by any means.

    If you dont have the balls to post a name with your comments then you must feel ashamed or scared of retailitory comments, or your just a pussy, your choice. Pick up a history book and read it before you make a complete ass of yourself!

  18. David Malmo-Levine on

    “I hear that man. As a black man I hate when these activists try to say that their the same as martin Luther king jr.”

    Nice try. All I said was civil disobedience was legit – I never claimed to be MLK Jr.

    “Get this through your heads please! Until pot smokers are forced to go to their own schools, their own bathrooms, there own restuarents, beaten up for being a pot smoker, have rocks thrown at you during your global marijuana marchs, and are jailed for simply looking at a non pot smoking women don’t even try to claim your struggle is anywhere close to the same as black Americans.”

    We have it almost as bad in Western countries (we get beat up and thrown in jail, denied scholarships and travel, beaten up regularly by the police and sometimes shot in our own homes) – read up on it if you don’t believe me:

    http://www.cannabisculture.com/v2/articles/1501.html

    http://www.cannabisculture.com/v2/articles/1786.html

    http://www.cannabisculture.com/v2/node/20295

    http://www.cannabisculture.com/v2/content/video-shows-violent-bc-police-takedown

    The drug war is far worse in other countries – you can get executed for drugwar crimes in 26 different countries – in China they kill hundreds of people every year.

    “I’m all for cannabis’ legalization. But these activists try to feed off of others struggles as if being thrown in a jail cell for the right to USE a plant is as horrible as ridding slavery, getting equal rights for women, and minorities which was based on how they LOOK not what they CHOOSE to do etc. You activists should really be ashamed of your selves.”

    You should be ashamed of YOURSELF. Look at the context of the conversation – we were talking about the validity of civil disobedience as a response to oppression – why are you pretending that I was speaking about how similar the euphoriphobia and smokeaphobia is to racism? It’s unfair to pretend I was comparing myself to MLK JR. or pretend I was calling myself a black person when clearly that’s not the case.

  19. David Malmo-Levine on

    “Jesus H Christ…are you seriously going to compare escaping oppression and persecution to not being able to get smashed by the substance of your choice?”

    “Smashed”? Or relaxed, hungry and happy?

    Harmless people should not be harmed, period. It matters not if it’s an immutable characteristic like race or sex, or a chosen characteristic like a religion or a taste in this medicine or that food – the point is that harmless people should not be harmed themselves.

    “They don’t even begin to compare to each other.”

    The harmless characteristics are very different, but the oppression is similar.

    “You need to rid yourself of this complex you have that makes you deluded into thinking you are some great messiah of the pot movement; you’re not! You won’t even be a footnote after it is all said and done.”

    Ah … I hear this a lot. Somebody attacks civil disobedience as a concept – then I use the words of MLK or Gandhi to defend civil disobedience as a concept and THEN I’m accused of comparing myself as a person to these people. This trickery is see-through. I’m not as wonderful as those other people, but civil disobedience is legit no matter who is using it to end whatever kind of oppression.

  20. Anonymous on

    Hi David, It’s the 28th of okt now so by now you must have got the results of the hearing.

    Great timing (or p’haps not?) since
    tomorow 29th of okt 09:00 am, My own hearing will start and at some point I’d like to use much of the same defense and much of the same methodes of how you went about it.

    Unnecesary to say how curious I am about the outcome of the verdict you got.

    Please bring it up here on CC before the end of the day 😉

    Thanks in Advance.

    G.G.

  21. Anonymous on

    In addition to that, Marc Emery lately showed off a list of endurences in here that Marijuana users/growers might have to face for only doing their thing and it is on no way less offensive then all unjustices that’s been done to Blacks, Slaves or Jews during Nazi occupation.

    (E.g. when MJ possesion becomes a capital offence There won’t be any difference in compare to previous injustices, and in disregard of our opposition no-one at this moment can assure us that we won’t be heading towards that direction as of yet! Hint: New World Order.)

    If it is Ones mission to grow MJ, one can debate it is our voluntary option to do so.

    In some occasions you might find yourselves hidden out of public view for years on end, deep down “underground ” in hidden basements trying to keep low profile only to eventually become busted and endure all hardship of the injustice or our “legal” system together with your relatives and suroundment.
    Pretty much like how Jews had to survive during WW2.

  22. Anonymous on

    @ Ano 3:18.

    You State “you hate”…. Sorry to hear you carry hate.

    I see it like this; Everyone on this planet is here on a mission.

    The goals to accomplish are for everyone different.

    I’d like to show Respect (as opposed to hate) for all of these goals and all of these differences.

    Martin Luther King, David Malmo-Levine, I Myself or You for that matter are of indifference to the respectability of our collective goals.

    To say it in short: We are all One, or to rephrase that more clearly: One love.

    Respect Man; Some whitey

  23. Anonymous on

    @ Ano 3:18.

  24. Anonymous on

    @ Ano 3:18.

  25. Anonymous on

    I hear that man. As a black man I hate when these activists try to say that their the same as martin Luther king jr. Get this through your heads please! Until pot smokers are forced to go to their own schools, their own bathrooms, there own restuarents, beaten up for being a pot smoker, have rocks thrown at you during your global marijuana marchs, and are jailed for simply looking at a non pot smoking women don’t even try to claim your struggle is anywhere close to the same as black Americans. I’m all for cannabis’ legalization. But these activists try to feed off of others struggles as if being thrown in a jail cell for the right to USE a plant is as horrible as ridding slavery, getting equal rights for women, and minorities which was based on how they LOOK not what they CHOOSE to do etc. You activists should really be ashamed of your selves.

  26. Policeman on

    Wow. Stupid enough to get deceived by some junkies, and this is what you stoners call your leaders. Haha good riddence I hope he gets more than a year. Opium is used to make heroin. Junkies don’t need opium to get off of heroin. They need it to get their next fix.

  27. Anonymous on

    I don’t know who you are Anonymous (you don’t know who I am either) but I think you have super-colossal-nerve with your comments.

    It’s easy to sit on your ass and decide that you don’t like David’s personality or whatever (I’ve never heard David refer to himself as a messiah) but at least David is willing to stand up for everyone who is part of our culture. If you don’t think we are oppressed you are living in a fantasy world. David’s the one that I’m sure IS a target of the fascists running things – and he stands his ground regardless. That’s bravery in my books. I applaud David for his actions and would be proud to stand shoulder to shoulder with him someday.

    I consider myself a Canadian patriot, and IMHO what we’re really talking about is FREEDOM. What business is it of the government’s anyway if someone indulges in a no-victim thing like weed, or opium, or whatever – as long as they’re not hurting anyone. No victim no crime. The government should stay the fuck out of our lives – and mind their own business.

    So please – in short – shut up.

  28. Anonymous on

    Jesus H Christ…are you seriously going to compare escaping oppression and persecution to not being able to get smashed by the substance of your choice?

    They don’t even begin to compare to each other.

    You need to rid yourself of this complex you have that makes you deluded into thinking you are some great messiah of the pot movement; you’re not! You won’t even be a footnote after it is all said and done.

    You’re not Thomas Paine,Ben Franklin,John Adams.Thomas Jefferson;Martin Luther King,Rosa Parks;Huge Hefner or even Larry Flynt.

    You need to get over yourself.

  29. David Malmo-Levine on

    I sold about an ounce of opium for the 3 and 1/2 years I was in business.

    I only sold to adults with pain issues or who were addicted to heroin.

    What pain killer do you use? Even aspirin has deaths involved with it. How is selling a plant that does things safer and more effectively than aspirin a problem?

  30. David Malmo-Levine on

    “really, it will do you wonders not fighting to the death for the civil rights of a bunch of weeds..”

    1) It’s rights for people, not weeds 2) It’s a herb, not a weed

  31. David Malmo-Levine on

    The Letter from Birmingham Jail or Letter from Birmingham City Jail, is an open letter written on April 16, 1963, by Martin Luther King, Jr., an American civil rights leader. King wrote the letter from the city jail in Birmingham, Alabama, where he was confined after being arrested for his part in the Birmingham campaign, a planned non-violent protest conducted by the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights and King’s Southern Christian Leadership Conference against racial segregation by Birmingham’s city government and downtown retailers.

    King’s letter is a response to a statement made by eight white Alabama clergymen on April 12, 1963, titled “A Call For Unity”. The clergymen agreed that social injustices existed but argued that the battle against racial segregation should be fought solely in the courts, not in the streets. King responded that without nonviolent forceful direct actions such as his, true civil rights could never be achieved. As he put it, “This ‘Wait’ has almost always meant ‘Never.'” He asserted that not only was civil disobedience justified in the face of unjust laws, but that “one has a moral responsibility to disobey unjust laws.”

    Extensive excerpts from the letter were published, without Dr. King’s consent, on May 19, 1963 in the New York Post Sunday Magazine. [1] The letter was first published as “Letter from Birmingham Jail” in the June, 1963 issue of Liberation[2] the June 12, 1963, edition of The Christian Century,[3] and in the June 24, 1963, issue of The New Leader. It was reprinted shortly thereafter in The Atlantic Monthly. King included the full text in his 1964 book Why We Can’t Wait.

    The letter includes the famous statement “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere,” as well as the words attributed to William E. Gladstone quoted by King: “[J]ustice too long delayed is justice denied.”
    [edit] Citations

    * “In any nonviolent campaign, there are four basic steps: collection of the facts to determine whether injustice exists; negotiations; self-purification; and direct action.”
    * “Nonviolent direct action seeks to create such a crisis and foster such a tension that a community which has constantly refused to negotiate is forced to confront the issue. It seeks to so dramatize the issue that it can no longer be ignored.”
    * “We know through painful experiences that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor, it must be demanded by the oppressed”.
    * “One has not only a legal but a moral responsibility to obey just laws. Conversely, one has a moral responsibility to disobey unjust laws. I would agree with St. Augustine that ‘an unjust law is no law at all’.”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Letter_from_Birmingham_Jail
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    .
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    .

    Civil Disobedience (Resistance to Civil Government) is an essay by Henry David Thoreau that was first published in 1849. It argues that people should not permit governments to overrule or atrophy their consciences, and that people have a duty to avoid allowing such acquiescence to enable the government to make them the agents of injustice.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_Disobedience_%28Thoreau%29
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    .
    .
    .

    American civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was also influenced by this essay. In his autobiography, he wrote:

    During my student days I read Henry David Thoreau’s essay On Civil Disobedience for the first time. Here, in this courageous New Englander’s refusal to pay his taxes and his choice of jail rather than support a war that would spread slavery’s territory into Mexico, I made my first contact with the theory of nonviolent resistance. Fascinated by the idea of refusing to cooperate with an evil system, I was so deeply moved that I reread the work several times.

    I became convinced that noncooperation with evil is as much a moral obligation as is cooperation with good. No other person has been more eloquent and passionate in getting this idea across than Henry David Thoreau. As a result of his writings and personal witness, we are the heirs of a legacy of creative protest. The teachings of Thoreau came alive in our civil rights movement; indeed, they are more alive than ever before. Whether expressed in a sit-in at lunch counters, a freedom ride into Mississippi, a peaceful protest in Albany, Georgia, a bus boycott in Montgomery, Alabama, these are outgrowths of Thoreau’s insistence that evil must be resisted and that no moral man can patiently adjust to injustice.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_Disobedience_%28Thoreau%29#Dr._Martin_Luther_King.2C_Jr.
    .
    .
    .
    .

    Civil disobedience is the active refusal to obey certain laws, demands and commands of a government, or of an occupying power, without resorting to physical violence. It is one of the primary methods of nonviolent resistance. In its most nonviolent form (in India, known as ahimsa or satyagraha) it could be said that it is compassion in the form of respectful disagreement.

    One of its earliest massive implementations was brought about by Egyptians against the British occupation in the nonviolent 1919 Revolution[1]. Civil disobedience is one of the many ways people have rebelled against unfair laws. It has been used in many well-documented nonviolent resistance movements in India (Gandhi’s campaigns for independence from the British Empire), in Czechoslovakia’s Velvet Revolution and in East Germany to oust their communist dictatorships,[2][3] in South Africa in the fight against apartheid, in the American Civil Rights Movement, in the Singing Revolution to bring independence to the Baltic countries from the Soviet Union, and recently in the 2004 Orange Revolution[4] and 2005 Rose Revolution, among other various movements worldwide.

    Following the Peterloo massacre of 1819, poet Percy Shelley wrote the political poem The Mask of Anarchy later that year, that begins with the powerful images of the unjust forms of authority of his time – and then imagines the stirrings of a radically new form of social action. It is perhaps the first modern statement of the principle of nonviolent protest.[5] A version was taken up by the author Henry David Thoreau in his essay Civil Disobedience, and later by Gandhi in his doctrine of Satyagraha.[5] Gandhi’s passive resistance was influenced and inspired by Shelley’s nonviolence in protest and political action.[6] In particular it is known that Gandhi would often quote Shelley’s Masque of Anarchy to vast audiences during the campaign for a free India.[7][5]

    Thoreau’s 1849 essay Civil Disobedience, originally titled “Resistance to Civil Government”, the driving idea behind the essay was that of self-reliance, and also how one is in morally good standing as long as one can “get off another man’s back”; so one does not necessarily have to physically fight the government, but one must not support it or have it support one (if one is against it). This essay has had a wide influence on many later practitioners of civil disobedience. In the essay, Thoreau explained his reasons for having refused to pay taxes as an act of protest against slavery and against the Mexican-American War.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_disobedience

  32. Alvin the Chipmonk on

    dave- anything that is planned & carried out is not pan disobedience. Thats cranky teenager living at home mad at Mom thinking

    Creative – the creative world- is not one of rules that must be smashed in and people who got there before you did caught up to & overthrown-

    To disobey implies there is someone you have to get around, If you were artistic or creative you would soon realize that if some goal is new- there is nobody there to get in your way. and therefore you have to neither obey or disobey them.. If you want a list of human evolution activities that don’t require disobedience, maybe sit down and write your own out,

    If you do end up in jail dave . put our tax dollars to work- ask for a laxative and access to the craft room. really, it will do you wonders not fighting to the death for the civil rights of a bunch of weeds..

    happy colouring ! and try to stay in the lines, just this once

  33. David Malmo-Levine on

    Stoners are not zombies, they are the most creative and sensitive people in the world:

    On the less controversial side of things: pot-smoking piano players in the whorehouses of Storyville in New Orleans brought the world Jazz music. [12] Most, if not all of, the decent rock and reggae music after 1965 was composed while the artists were high – and probably over half of the best rap music. [13] The best comedy of the last twenty or thirty years? Potheads. [14] The personal computer and much of the decent software in this world? Potheads. [15] The best writers and poets? Potheads. [16] And I think it’s safe to say a very large percentage of professional athletes – especially NBA and Snowboarding athletes – had their professional performances enhanced when high – or by what they had learned while high. [17]

    But let’s also speak more controversially: there is strong evidence Shakespeare [18] and Jesus [19] were also really, really high. The evidence for Jesus was that the holy “Christ/Messiah” anointing oil that was used during his baptism and for the healing miracles and duties of him and his apostles. The evidence for Shakespeare was that his pipes were full of cannabis resins. In fact, its fair to say that cannabis has had a profound effect on the minds of those behind many religions [20] and much of modern theater – which now also embraces Hollywood. [21] Say what you want about the benefits and drawbacks of religion and Hollywood, but you have to admit that the insight-filled “time-slow cannabis high” has been part of the process of human cultural evolution. Religion has brought us the Golden Rule. Hollywood brought us “They Live”, “Brazil”, and “Blade Runner”. Ultimately, humans have benefited from both relationships.

    http://www.cannabisculture.com/v2/content/human-and-cannabis-coevolution

  34. David Malmo-Levine on

    Every time human beings evolve it takes civil disobedience to do it.

    Slaves escaping slavery, women fighting for the right to vote, Indians fighting for independence from Britain, the Civil Rights movement, the American Indian Movement, the anti-war and anti-nuke movement, and the industrial hemp movement and the medical marijuana movement and the supervised injection site all required civil disobedience to gain results.

    Furthermore, the government has ignored the LeDain Commission for 37 years and the Senate Report for seven years, so all “within the system” attempts at redressing the evil have been tried.

    Furthermore, Dana Larsen has had trouble getting the most radical of the big political parties (the NDP) to support a legalization platform – the current political system does not allow for reform.

    So unless you can address the above points, I think your perspective will been seen as the illogical one by people who are open to an honest review of the facts.

  35. Anonymous on

    he is a dedicated life long shit disturber and their are many who want him behind bars in time for the Olympics, he is a known party pooper, DML + the olympics will be a riot- and i do mean R I O T Imagine dave leading 10,000 stoner zombies onto the centre of the festivities to smoke, urinate in the snow and yell drug culture mouth trash at the squeeky clean jocks- maybe even inducing tourists to buy dope

  36. Anonymous on

    Its called a keg party

  37. Anonymous on

    There is nothing inherently wrong with opium. Get a life man, are you an adult? If you are then you know that adults take responsibility for their own purchases.

    How many beers have you drank this week out of aluminum cans, made from fluoridated water and genetically modified hops…..which is worse idiot?

    Don’t sell beer.

  38. Anonymous on

    David was selling opium – shit, I love opium and can never get any. It’s always weed or shrooms. Man, I really missed out. There’s nothing better IMHO than some nice afghani buds or thai sticks dipped in opium wash. Yummy! If the school ever starts up again I will be their best customer. Go David, go David, go David!

    PS

    I think David should get some kind of award at his sentencing, not jail time.

    Peace

  39. Silence Dogood on

    I have no problem with educating the masses on the ridiculous history of cannabis, but that fact that David was selling opium or any illegal narcotics is lunacy in my opinion. Overgrow the government, fine. I dig that. But selling opium, shit. That’s not productive. In fact, it hurts the cause. Give the pot away for free. Make THAT statement.

    Don’t sell opium.

  40. Jay Dell on

    Man the crown is as ass backwards as it gets.David is an outstanding person with courage ,compassion and true meaning of an activist.A person with a true comitment to harm reduction and a leader of how it has to be done.The courts can find not one iota of evidence to prove David has done any harm what so ever.The truth is the herb school a needed addition to a society that cares.

    The main issue is and should always be clean safe preventive medicine for the citizens to access.

    Hats off for David Malmo-Levine.

    The rodeo clown has had enough Bull!

  41. eclecticone on

    David, Demand a victim impact statement before sentencing. The failure of the crown to produce one, is further affirmation of the harmlessness of your activities to the public.

    Brian
    PS
    It seems as you are the only victim here.