Working In The Coal Mines

Recently I saw the movie Taking Woodstock. In many ways it was a fair depiction of the exuberance of the sixties.

Even though the war was going on, we were living in a society in which a good portion of youth were searching for something different and were trying to discover themselves. They were alienated from a system upon which they could have little effect- so they dropped out. Did a DIY (that is, do it yourself) and created their own realities.

Much of what we are still fighting for came out of the consciousness of that era. The universal human rights, the environmental movement, feminism, civil rights, disabled rights. Even though the U.S. was involved in a cruel war, there was hope of creating a better society and dragging the government along with it. Bob Dylan’s words “Come senators, congressmen/ Please heed the call/ Don’t stand in the doorway/ Don’t block up the hall/ For he that gets hurt/ Will be he who has stalled/ There’s a battle outside/ And it is ragin’/ It’ll soon shake your windows/ And rattle your walls/ For the times they are a-changin.” and that mood was in the air.

Something that isn’t mentioned in all of this is the cost of living. I worked part-time and shared a large apartment in New York City with two other people who also worked part time. Today it would take 4 people working full time to rent the same apartment. I had a friend who worked part time for a year and saved up enough money to travel around the world for six months, it just didn’t cost that much to live. It allowed the youth of that time a tremendous amount of freedom and experience and to get an education without coming out of college with a debt that will take years to pay.

This change is not incidental. It was created by a conspiracy of governmental statists and apprehensive capitalists. A survey was taken in 1969, the result of the study showed most people felt that their happiness was more important than their financial success. This sent shivers up the spines of the ruling classes who needed workers in the coal mine who were willing to claw their way up an economic ladder in order for them, the owners, to live a life of indolence and ease- and make no mistake about it, the rich don’t live the way most of us do. They live behind closed gates, enclosed communities, and they don’t want you to see it.

The statists were afraid of unbridled individualism- what if people started to actually think about their lives? It was ok to give them plenty when they were in their dream state in the fifties, but by the late sixties the demands were beginning to ferment. How do you get this genie back in the bottle? Starve it and put all the food in the bottle, it will go back. You don’t have to rub it 3 times.

You were probably wondering where marijuana comes into all this. Well, marijuana is the lubricant that allows the mind to journey, to think thoughts out of the set that was designed to reign us in. If you will, dream the impossible dream, to see new vistas beyond the immediate That’s what being a couch potato is all about. Isn’t it? That is why marijuana is such a priority in the criminal justice system and other government faculties.

Marijuana is a vaccination from oppression. The 1960s-80s Yippies had a sound bite about this, “when freedom is outlawed only outlaws will be free.” Perhaps more appropriate is Fat Freddie’s comment, “pot will get you through times of no money better than money will get you through times of no pot.” Or maybe pot could stir the economy and spur new our dreams of freedom.

Comments

11 Comments

  1. Anonymous on

    Maybe the younger generation just needs to focus on their responsibility, today, and stop paying attention to babbling bullshitters.

    And BTW. Ed’s job is done. He’s no longer useful.

  2. Anonymous on

    Even if it’s just some old rethoric doesn’t mean it’s less actuall.

    Might be usefull to younger generations who are about to create a brand new vision of their own and like to add this to their prospective luggage.

    Either way, job well done Ed.

  3. Anonymous on

    Ed, you’re a good guy. But I don’t believe you actually wrote this article. You’re no longer capable. Did someone write it for you. Did you just sign your name to it. (was it one of the guys sitting next to you on the couch who wrote it?)

  4. Anonymous on

    lol 😉

  5. Anonymous on

    He’s just readin waaay too much into shit.

  6. Anonymous on

    In due respect of the former post in wich I reckognise anonymous beeing conserned of Ed´s well beeing…
    I also reckognise Ed beeing conserned about present days developments.
    I think the both of you have got a point, at times it´ll be wise to be aware of what´s happening and at times it´s wise to chill out and be relaxed about it all.
    Ed we love you man, as well as all the non profileble anonymouses out here. :)

  7. Anonymous on

    It ain’t healthy man, You’re readin’ too much into shit!

  8. Anonymous on

    Anyone willing to complain about spelling and grammar failures in the former post I recommend to turn to our CC staff to accomplish an edit option.
    Thanks in advance.

  9. Anonymous on

    So true, if it were legal I ‘d be growing it together with my tomatoes,carrots and runner beans and be sharing it with all my family,friends and neighbourhood after the usual exeptional exuberant harvest.

    Cost of living…?
    Grow a crop and let the Gov take care of governmental burdens conserning monthly fees over expenses cover up by themselves.

    my two cents.

  10. Anonymous on

    I think the problem is that the laws are made by people who have never used pot. If all you know about it is what you hear and read, you’ll think it’s a typical drug of abuse. You’ll think it’s something that produces euphoria and makes you dopey. You’ll probably think it’s similar in effect to opium but somewhat weaker and with less withdrawal symptoms. You’ll say let’s put it in the same class as opium and its derivatives because this just must be bad in some way if it gets you “high”, like opium does.
    You can be quite certain that none of the people who were involved in formulating US Cannabis policy ever actually used it. Once you do use it for a while, you know that it’s really nothing that has any significant negative effects and that the high, while pleasant, is not something you would rob people to get money for or that would take priority over the other things in your life, like working or taking care of your kids.

  11. Anonymous on

    “This change is not incidental. It was created by a conspiracy of governmental statists and apprehensive capitalists.”I respectfully disagree with Ed on this point. Rising cost of living is the natural progression of capitalism, with no small part due to increased taxation.
    “pot will get you through times of no money better than money will get you through times of no pot.” is a fabulously furry freaky thing to say though and I’m sure Fat Freddy also: knew it’s all about the cat.