Ousted idols

Frenchie DaviesFrenchie DaviesUnexploited singing talents are lining up by the thousands in cities across the UK, the US and Canada, hoping for a chance to compete in the latest reality TV sensation: the Pop, American, and Canadian Idol shows, respectively.
But if you’re a fan of good reefer then don’t bother waiting in line. Never mind that many major musicians use sex to sell their music and ganja to enhance their performance, in reality TV’s not-so-real world, Idols don’t get busted for buds, nor do they bare their skin in public.

Most famous of the ousted Idols is 23-year-old American Idol contestant Frenchie Davis, who was barred from the contest for having once bared her breasts for a sexy website.

American Idol entrants are also closely screened for past pot offenses. An Idol hopeful, who waited in line overnight with thousands of others, told Cannabis Culture that one of her friends had been turned away from the competition after admitting to a ganja trafficking record.

According to Idol rules, no “non-prescription controlled substances will be permitted at any audition or during the competition.” Further, contestants can be disqualified for admitting to past convictions, or for failure to disclose them.

Tynisha GoddardTynisha GoddardCannabian idols

Canadian Idol fans have heard of pot smuggler Tynisha Goddard from Winnipeg, who made Canadian Idol entry judges weep when she sang for them at her qualifying performance, and rocketed into the top 30 contestants. Goddard left the contest after confessing that she had just spent 27 months in US detention centers for trying to smuggle pot from Jamaica to Toronto. She had been released from US custody only days before trying out for Canadian Idol.

“The entire production team is disappointed that Tynisha is unable to continue,” executive producer John Brunton told the media, adding that Goddard would be welcome to return to next year’s show, if she could just clear up her visa problems with the US.

Behind the scenes, lesser-known Andre Petitpas was ejected from the Canadian Idol competition without apology. Petitpas had made it into the top 100 before confessing that he was currently facing charges of cannabis cultivation and trafficking. He was disqualified from the competition without a welcome back.

“Honesty didn’t get me anywhere,” Petitpas told Cannabis Culture. “Basically, I don’t wish to blame Canadian Idol so badly, but it’s regrettable to me that we live in a society where people are looked down to because of pot.”

Cannabis Culture called Canadian Idol spokesperson Stacy Cunningham to ask why Canadian contestants were being chucked for bud busts, and discovered it was still due to US influence.

“Our top Canadian Idols have to travel to the United States,” she explained. “So we can’t have one of our Idols not being able to travel with the group.”

? Andre Petitpas: starmind.topcities.com

Tynisha Goddard* American Idol judge Paula Abdul is happy to sing and dance for the drug warriors. She starred in the 1995 film Just Say kNOw to Drugs, and did an anti-drug clip for Arsenio Hall’s Chunky A CD.

* Simon Fuller is the music-media magnate who created Pop Idol, and then spawned its North American clones. Fuller also created prefab mega-bands such as the Spice Girls and S Club 7.

Pot has brought down Fuller’s media spawn before. In late 2001, three members of S Club 7 were “cautioned” by UK cops after getting caught toking up in the street.

The following media attacks were vicious, and tarnished the mega-band’s popularity. They were even threatened with lawsuits over merchandising deals derailed by the loss of their “squeaky-clean” image.

Even though the offending trio issued a public apology for their reefer use, it was too late. Their popularity spiralled downward, leading to their final break-up in early 2003.

Their early demise cost Fuller years of lost future revenues. Perhaps this is another reason why Fuller’s Idol contestants must all be certified free of herb and scandal.