Hemp prisoner sues captors

Canadian hempster Paul Wylie, who spent most of 1999 in a squalid Nicaraguan prison after his government-approved Nicaraguan hemp crop was declared illegal, is back in Central America for the first time since he escaped his dungeon prison cell.
Wylie was working for the Canadian company Hemp-Agro in 1998, when armed government agents kidnapped him and threw him in prison, claiming that his low-THC outdoor hemp plantation was actually a marijuana grow operation.

The Toronto-area native nearly died in prison, but was eventually allowed to “escape” with government permission.

Now he’s back in Nicaragua in time for the country’s elections, but Wylie isn’t voting.

“We have filed a lawsuit asking for $189 million in damages,” Wylie told Cannabis Culture from Managua. “That includes the damage they did to our crop and equipment, as well as the torture they inflicted on me by arresting me on bogus charges and putting me in that horrible place.”

Wylie says he’s optimistic that the country’s political climate and the strength of his case will result in a court victory. He says he will find out by year’s end if the suit is successful.

“Believe it or not, I’m still encouraging the Nicaraguan government and everybody else to grow hemp,” Wylie says. “We just put together a major scientific proposal that shows why hemp would be an incredibly beneficial crop for the environment and economically. I won’t give up until hemp is growing everywhere for every purpose.”

* Wylie can be reached via email at [email protected]

* Wylie was working for the Canadian company Hemp-Agro in 1998, when armed government agents kidnapped him and threw him in prison, claiming that his low-THC outdoor hemp plantation was actually a marijuana grow operation. (CC#17, Hemp Bust in Nicaragua)

* The Toronto-area native nearly died in prison, but was eventually allowed to “escape” with government permission. (CC#27, Nicaraguan hemp nightmare)

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